Microsoft to offer dual upgrade path for Windows 8

One for the technical, another for the not so


Microsoft will change its upgrade procedures when it introduces Windows 8, offering a simple system for home users and a more technical option for IT staff.

Redmond said it wants to make the upgrade path easier, since the Windows 7 introduction saw some users complaining that the process was too complicated. To ease the introduction of Windows 8, Microsoft will now offer two options for those looking to make the leap to the new OS: a streamlined and an advanced setup. The new format will dramatically decrease upgrade times, Microsoft promised.

Streamlined setup will be enabled for those running the upgrade software from either an .exe file on a DVD or when downloading the new OS from Microsoft’s web site. Microsoft has combined the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor, Windows Easy Transfer, and Setup applications into a single-run wizard intended to handle all aspects of upgrading much faster.

Windows upgrade comparison

Microsoft claims a major speed boost to upgrading, be you technical or not

The wizard identifies any potential problems with the upgrade (such as duff drivers), lets the user decide if they are vital, and then sets up to transfer applications, Windows settings, and personal files from the Windows 7 system being replaced. Those upgrading from Vista can’t shift applications, and XP users are limited to just moving personal files.

Microsoft estimates that the old Windows 7 upgrade process took around 60 dialog boxes and four wizards to complete, but says that the new process can be completed in just 11 clicks contained in a single application. This dramatically speeds up the process, Redmond claims.

Windows 7 setup

Upgrading to Windows 7 took a lot of clicks

For more-advanced users loading from DVD or USB stick, the same upgrade wizard has extra levels, allowing full support for unattended installation, partition selection, and formatting during the upgrade process. The system can also be set up for dual boot configuration, and the file-transfer method has been simplified, with whole folders being moved en masse, rather than individual files.

“With Windows 8 setup we have greatly improved both speed and ease of use, while still retaining all of the advanced setup functionality that many customers will demand,” blogged Christa St. Pierre of Microsoft’s setup and deployment team. “We have integrated what was once many separate steps for people to perform when preparing and starting their setup into a streamlined user experience, with a fast and reliable setup engine under the hood.” ®


Other stories you might like

  • Deepfake attacks can easily trick live facial recognition systems online
    Plus: Next PyTorch release will support Apple GPUs so devs can train neural networks on their own laptops

    In brief Miscreants can easily steal someone else's identity by tricking live facial recognition software using deepfakes, according to a new report.

    Sensity AI, a startup focused on tackling identity fraud, carried out a series of pretend attacks. Engineers scanned the image of someone from an ID card, and mapped their likeness onto another person's face. Sensity then tested whether they could breach live facial recognition systems by tricking them into believing the pretend attacker is a real user.

    So-called "liveness tests" try to authenticate identities in real-time, relying on images or video streams from cameras like face recognition used to unlock mobile phones, for example. Nine out of ten vendors failed Sensity's live deepfake attacks.

    Continue reading
  • Lonestar plans to put datacenters in the Moon's lava tubes
    How? Founder tells The Register 'Robots… lots of robots'

    Imagine a future where racks of computer servers hum quietly in darkness below the surface of the Moon.

    Here is where some of the most important data is stored, to be left untouched for as long as can be. The idea sounds like something from science-fiction, but one startup that recently emerged from stealth is trying to turn it into a reality. Lonestar Data Holdings has a unique mission unlike any other cloud provider: to build datacenters on the Moon backing up the world's data.

    "It's inconceivable to me that we are keeping our most precious assets, our knowledge and our data, on Earth, where we're setting off bombs and burning things," Christopher Stott, founder and CEO of Lonestar, told The Register. "We need to put our assets in place off our planet, where we can keep it safe."

    Continue reading
  • Conti: Russian-backed rulers of Costa Rican hacktocracy?
    Also, Chinese IT admin jailed for deleting database, and the NSA promises no more backdoors

    In brief The notorious Russian-aligned Conti ransomware gang has upped the ante in its attack against Costa Rica, threatening to overthrow the government if it doesn't pay a $20 million ransom. 

    Costa Rican president Rodrigo Chaves said that the country is effectively at war with the gang, who in April infiltrated the government's computer systems, gaining a foothold in 27 agencies at various government levels. The US State Department has offered a $15 million reward leading to the capture of Conti's leaders, who it said have made more than $150 million from 1,000+ victims.

    Conti claimed this week that it has insiders in the Costa Rican government, the AP reported, warning that "We are determined to overthrow the government by means of a cyber attack, we have already shown you all the strength and power, you have introduced an emergency." 

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022