Phone-hack saga: Cop bung probe nets seventh suspect

Woman cuffed by Yard this morning


A 37-year-old woman was arrested this morning by Scotland Yard officers working on Operation Elveden, which is an investigation into allegations of "inappropriate payments to police".

The unnamed suspect was cuffed at a home in Surrey, the Met said. She is currently being held in custody at a south London police station.

Alleged corrupt payments to officers at Scotland Yard by people working for the now-defunct News International-owned News of the World is being probed by the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

The investigation is being undertaken in tandem with Operation Weeting and Operation Tuleta.

So far, 16 people have been cuffed by police probing alleged phone-hacking claims - said to have been rampant at the axed Sunday tabloid, which was part of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp empire until July this year.

Operation Tuleta, which is a probe into alleged computer hacking by newspaper employees or contractors, led to the arrest of its first suspect last month: A 52-year-old man from Milton Keynes.

Charges are yet to be brought against any of the suspects arrested under those three Met investigations.

Separately, News International chairman James Murdoch wrote to the media, culture and sport select committee this week confirming that he had been sent an email in June 2008 from the NotW editor Colin Myler that stated:

"Update on the Gordon Taylor (Professional Football Association) case. Unfortunately it is as bad as we feared."

The email went on to mention "a further nightmare scenario" that suggested that Joanne Armstrong, an in-house lawyer at the PFA, had also had her phone hacked.

Myler requested a meeting with Murdoch to discuss the matter. However, in his letter to the committee, the NI chairman claimed that he hadn't read the full email on his BlackBerry handset, which he typically received messages on outside of normal work hours.

"I am confident that I did not review the full email chain at the time or afterwards, nor do I recall a conversation with Mr Myler over that weekend," he added.

Murdoch Junior ended the missive by reiterating that he stood by his testimony to the committee, when he insisted that he was unaware that phone hacking at the News of the World went beyond "one rogue reporter". ®


Other stories you might like

  • Microsoft unveils Android apps for Windows 11 (for US users only)

    Windows Insiders get their hands on the Windows Subsystem for Android

    Microsoft has further teased the arrival of the Windows Subsystem for Android by detailing how the platform will work via a newly published document for Windows Insiders.

    The document, spotted by inveterate Microsoft prodder "WalkingCat" makes for interesting reading for developers keen to make their applications work in the Windows Subsystem for Android (WSA).

    WSA itself comprises the Android OS based on the Android Open Source Project 1.1 and, like the Windows Subsystem for Linux, runs in a virtual machine.

    Continue reading
  • Software Freedom Conservancy sues TV maker Vizio for GPL infringement

    Companies using GPL software should meet their obligations, lawsuit says

    The Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC), a non-profit which supports and defends free software, has taken legal action against Californian TV manufacturer Vizio Inc, claiming "repeated failures to fulfill even the basic requirements of the General Public License (GPL)."

    Member projects of the SFC include the Debian Copyright Aggregation Project, BusyBox, Git, GPL Compliance Project for Linux Developers, Homebrew, Mercurial, OpenWrt, phpMyAdmin, QEMU, Samba, Selenium, Wine, and many more.

    The GPL Compliance Project is described as "comprised of copyright holders in the kernel, Linux, who have contributed to Linux under its license, the GPLv2. These copyright holders have formally asked Conservancy to engage in compliance efforts for their copyrights in the Linux kernel."

    Continue reading
  • DRAM, it stacks up: SK hynix rolls out 819GB/s HBM3 tech

    Kit using the chips to appear next year at the earliest

    Korean DRAM fabber SK hynix has developed an HBM3 DRAM chip operating at 819GB/sec.

    HBM3 (High Bandwidth Memory 3) is a third generation of the HBM architecture which stacks DRAM chips one above another, connects them by vertical current-carrying holes called Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) to a base interposer board, via connecting micro-bumps, upon which is fastened a processor that accesses the data in the DRAM chip faster than it would through the traditional CPU socket interface.

    Seon-yong Cha, SK hynix's senior vice president for DRAM development, said: "Since its launch of the world's first HBM DRAM, SK hynix has succeeded in developing the industry's first HBM3 after leading the HBM2E market. We will continue our efforts to solidify our leadership in the premium memory market."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021