Apple to appeal Italian warranty fine

Cupertino PR may be fired for speaking to el Reg, though


Apple will appeal against the fine imposed by the Italian regulator for failing to respect the legal warranty requirements, and (astonishingly) we know this because Apple told us.

The fruitchomp firm reckons that despite the regulator's ruling it is complying with Italian law, and will be appealing against the decision by the regulator to fine the company $1.2m. The Italian authorities have accused Apple of failing to advise customers of their legal right to a two-year warranty, instead offering them one year and then promoting AppleCare as an optional extension, an accusation Apple denies.

But what's most remarkable, to us, is that we got the news from the horse's mouth. (Not the Italian government horse.)

Apple famously only speaks to media it likes, and The Register has not been on that list for a very long time. Calls to Cupertino (or local reps) are answered politely, and messages taken, but return calls never materialise, and company statements never find their way into El Reg mailboxes.

In the last few years we've taken to wondering if anyone actually reads the correspondence submitted, or if the Apple press office is just a holder for /dev/null. But appeals for reassurance on the matter meet the same wall of silence as questions on policy or planning.

We do have one or two contacts within Apple, employees willing to confirm that the company has a physical presence and can even receive communications from the outside world, just not from The Register it seemed.

Relationships with all corporate PRs are slightly strange - such people are overtly friendly in the hope of getting coverage, but always annoyed when that coverage isn't as favourable as they had hoped. As one reader-turned-story told us: "It's not quite so funny when you're on the other side".

We've been accused of being anti-Apple, but really we're not, we're anti-just-about-everybody. If you only read our coverage of Apple then you might conclude we're plotting against Cupertino, but you could reach the same conclusion about any company if you restrict your reading to those stories - only by reading a breadth of The Register does our equal-opportunities approach become clear.

Whether Apple has really forgiven, we don't know. Perhaps three ghosts spent Christmas hanging around Cupertino, or perhaps a hapless PR has communicated with us by accident and will shortly be fired for this heinous blunder - we hope not. Anyway we're delighted to wish everyone at the company a very happy new year and hope to hear from them again sooner than say 2022.

Oh - and they're appealing against the Italian decision, in case you missed that. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Talos names eight deadly sins in widely used industrial software
    Entire swaths of gear relies on vulnerability-laden Open Automation Software (OAS)

    A researcher at Cisco's Talos threat intelligence team found eight vulnerabilities in the Open Automation Software (OAS) platform that, if exploited, could enable a bad actor to access a device and run code on a targeted system.

    The OAS platform is widely used by a range of industrial enterprises, essentially facilitating the transfer of data within an IT environment between hardware and software and playing a central role in organizations' industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) efforts. It touches a range of devices, including PLCs and OPCs and IoT devices, as well as custom applications and APIs, databases and edge systems.

    Companies like Volvo, General Dynamics, JBT Aerotech and wind-turbine maker AES are among the users of the OAS platform.

    Continue reading
  • Despite global uncertainty, $500m hit doesn't rattle Nvidia execs
    CEO acknowledges impact of war, pandemic but says fundamentals ‘are really good’

    Nvidia is expecting a $500 million hit to its global datacenter and consumer business in the second quarter due to COVID lockdowns in China and Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Despite those and other macroeconomic concerns, executives are still optimistic about future prospects.

    "The full impact and duration of the war in Ukraine and COVID lockdowns in China is difficult to predict. However, the impact of our technology and our market opportunities remain unchanged," said Jensen Huang, Nvidia's CEO and co-founder, during the company's first-quarter earnings call.

    Those two statements might sound a little contradictory, including to some investors, particularly following the stock selloff yesterday after concerns over Russia and China prompted Nvidia to issue lower-than-expected guidance for second-quarter revenue.

    Continue reading
  • Another AI supercomputer from HPE: Champollion lands in France
    That's the second in a week following similar system in Munich also aimed at researchers

    HPE is lifting the lid on a new AI supercomputer – the second this week – aimed at building and training larger machine learning models to underpin research.

    Based at HPE's Center of Excellence in Grenoble, France, the new supercomputer is to be named Champollion after the French scholar who made advances in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs in the 19th century. It was built in partnership with Nvidia using AMD-based Apollo computer nodes fitted with Nvidia's A100 GPUs.

    Champollion brings together HPC and purpose-built AI technologies to train machine learning models at scale and unlock results faster, HPE said. HPE already provides HPC and AI resources from its Grenoble facilities for customers, and the broader research community to access, and said it plans to provide access to Champollion for scientists and engineers globally to accelerate testing of their AI models and research.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022