Google goggles with Terminator HUD 'coming soon'

8GB of flash, front-facing cam, voice recog and head-tilting nav


Google is actually working on twitch-responsive sci-fi-style head-up display glasses, according to a report by 9TO5Google. And the new tech apparently includes a cursor that responds to head movements.

The article includes great eye-candy, including a clip from CES 2012 on Motorola's headset computer and a Terminator clip. According to the source, the Google HUD specs look similar to a pair of Oakley Thump shades.

Oakley Thumps

Oakley Thump specs...

The Google specs have a HUD on one side only, the other side has an arm packed with a 1GHz ARM CPU, 256MB of RAM and 8GB of, presumably, flash memory, for operating system software load. But these are speculative hardware specs. What operating system will be used? Android of course.

Terminator HUD Image

Street view plus: Terminator eat your heart out.

The cursor on the HUD screen is moved and "clicked" by the geeky wearer tilting his head – this should look like a nervous head tick to onlookers.

We're told these HUD shades will have voice input and output, so there must be a mike and headphones, but you will have to speak ... very... clearly. There will also be a low-res camera plus Wi-Fi and/or Bluetooth comms plus GPS.

IRON_MAN

Look forward to an Iron Man-style display that isn't cooked up in AfterEffects...

There needs to be a constant communication facility though, so a mobile phone link is likely to be necessary too.

As the wearer walks around, the clever shades know where he/she is and can pop up locationally relevant information: "Special offer on Burger King flame-grilled Whoppers today!"

There's talk of a beta program. Bet the entrance to that will be hotly contested.

If Google can get these glorious little suckers working they will become absolutely, must-have, gee-whiz tech – that is, we think, a monumentally big "IF". ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Uncle Sam to clip wings of Pegasus-like spyware – sorry, 'intrusion software' – with proposed export controls

    Surveillance tech faces trade limits as America syncs policy with treaty obligations

    More than six years after proposing export restrictions on "intrusion software," the US Commerce Department's Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has formulated a rule that it believes balances the latitude required to investigate cyber threats with the need to limit dangerous code.

    The BIS on Wednesday announced an interim final rule that defines when an export license will be required to distribute what is basically commercial spyware, in order to align US policy with the 1996 Wassenaar Arrangement, an international arms control regime.

    The rule [PDF] – which spans 65 pages – aims to prevent the distribution of surveillance tools, like NSO Group's Pegasus, to countries subject to arms controls, like China and Russia, while allowing legitimate security research and transactions to continue. Made available for public comment over the next 45 days, the rule is scheduled to be finalized in 90 days.

    Continue reading
  • Global IT spending to hit $4.5 trillion in 2022, says Gartner

    The future's bright, and expensive

    Corporate technology soothsayer Gartner is forecasting worldwide IT spending will hit $4.5tr in 2022, up 5.5 per cent from 2021.

    The strongest growth is set to come from enterprise software, which the analyst firm expects to increase by 11.5 per cent in 2022 to reach a global spending level of £670bn. Growth has fallen slightly, though. In 2021 it was 13.6 per cent for this market segment. The increase was driven by infrastructure software spending, which outpaced application software spending.

    The largest chunk of IT spending is set to remain communication services, which will reach £1.48tr next year, after modest growth of 2.1 per cent. The next largest category is IT services, which is set to grow by 8.9 per cent to reach $1.29tr over the next year, according to the analysts.

    Continue reading
  • Memory maker Micron moots $150bn mega manufacturing moneybag

    AI and 5G to fuel demand for new plants and R&D

    Chip giant Micron has announced a $150bn global investment plan designed to support manufacturing and research over the next decade.

    The memory maker said it would include expansion of its fabrication facilities to help meet demand.

    As well as chip shortages due to COVID-19 disruption, the $21bn-revenue company said it wanted to take advantage of the fact memory and storage accounts for around 30 per cent of the global semiconductor industry today.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021