Crocodoc tries to take bite out of Adobe dominance

Office and PDF viewer aims to assassinate Acrobat


Crocodoc is looking to take a big chunk out of Adobe's market share with an HTML5 viewing and annotation system for PDFs and Office documents that eliminates plug-ins or vulnerable software.

"I think we beat Adobe to the punch," CEO Ryan Damico told The Register. "We're taken a file format that they've created that's now an open standard and we now offer an HTML5 viewer for their own file format and they're nowhere near to offering the same abilities. Abode's a great example of the kind of traditional desktop software that we're disrupting."

Shifting away from software would also give an additional security benefit, since it would get rid of the threats that Adobe's code has been coming under. The ubiquity of Adobe software has made it a prime attack vector over the last few years.

Web app developers can build applications using Crocodocs' iFrame and JavaScript libraries to either access documents as a service from its servers or from corporate intranets. All sessions are SSL encrypted and run off ephemeral URLs to minimize any threat, with additional control options available like password protection.

Pricing will be on a per item basis, Darnico explained, adding it would amount to "pennies per document," with the usual discounts available to larger corporate customers. Small businesses would be more suited to Crocodocs' SaaS service, he said, while larger enterprises would probably want to run their own repositories.

The system works with Android 2.2 and above and anything younger than version 4 of iOS; viewers for Phone 7 and RIM's latest builds will come online if there's the demand for them.

Crocodocs has been around since 2006, but this is the first time it has made a serious play for the enterprise market. The company has already signed up SAP to use its tools in a forthcoming release of Spotlight, and both DropBox and LinkedIn have already signed up. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Adobe lowers 2022 forecast, blames Ukraine war, strong dollar
    Extended 'summer season' also at fault, says software slinger as share price slides

    Creative software slinger Adobe booked in double-digit revenues rises in its latest quarter but lowered forecasts due to conflict in Ukraine and and currency challenges. As such, Wall Street frowned and the share price went down.

    The Photoshop maker reported turnover from sales of $4.39 billion for Q2 ended June 3, up 14 percent year-on-year. The vast bulk of this, some $4.07 billion, was subscription-based, something other software vendors must eye with some envy because investors love recurring revenues.

    The Digital Media division, which includes Creative Cloud and Document Cloud products, jumped 15 percent to $3.20 billion, higher than analysts had estimated. The Digital Experience wing was $1.1bn, up 17 per cent, again trumping analysts' projections of $1.08 billion.

    Continue reading
  • Microsoft fixes under-attack Windows zero-day Follina
    Plus: Intel, AMD react to Hertzbleed data-leaking holes in CPUs

    Patch Tuesday Microsoft claims to have finally fixed the Follina zero-day flaw in Windows as part of its June Patch Tuesday batch, which included security updates to address 55 vulnerabilities.

    Follina, eventually acknowledged by Redmond in a security advisory last month, is the most significant of the bunch as it has already been exploited in the wild.

    Criminals and snoops can abuse the remote code execution (RCE) bug, tracked as CVE-2022-30190, by crafting a file, such as a Word document, so that when opened it calls out to the Microsoft Windows Support Diagnostic Tool, which is then exploited to run malicious code, such spyware and ransomware. Disabling macros in, say, Word won't stop this from happening.

    Continue reading
  • Adobe apologizes for repeated outages of its Creative Cloud video collaboration service
    Frame.io admits it was 'slow to scale as demand rose

    Adobe-owned cloudy video workflow outfit Frame.io has apologized and promised to do better after a series of lengthy outages to its service, which became part of Adobe's flagship Creative Cloud in 2021.

    Frame.io bills itself as "The fastest, easiest, and most secure way to automatically get footage from cameras to collaborators – anywhere in the world" because its "Camera to Cloud" approach "eliminates the delay between production and post" by uploading audio and video "from the set to Frame.io between each take." In theory, that means all the creatives involved in filmed projects don't have to wait before getting to work.

    In theory. Customers say that's not the current Frame.io experience. Downdetector's listing for the site records plenty of complaints about outages and tweets like the one below are not hard to find.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022