OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 240GB PCI-E SSD

So long, SATA


Review

Extreme PC Week

One wonders if, after ratifying the SATA 6Gb/s standard, the people at the SATA-IO (Serial ATA International Organization) gave themselves a pat on the back to say job well done, that’s that future-proofed for a while, we can relax now.

OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 240GB PCI-E SSD

Scorchio: OCZ's RevoDrive 3 X2

After all, you could hardly blame them for that, as the old disk spinning mechanical drives have trouble getting anywhere near the previous SATA 2 (3Gb/s) standards limit so the SATA 3 (6Gb/s) interface isn’t going to be troubled for quite some time, or so they thought.

Yet it appears what the great and the good at SATA-IO didn’t see looming on the horizon – and they certainly weren’t the only ones – was the huge rise in consumer SSDs. Even now, the solid state storage on offer is very close to completely swallowing all the bandwidth available on the SATA 6Gb/s interface – so much for future-proofing.

OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 240GB PCI-E SSD

Minus daughtercard: note the two Sandforce controllers

Some companies could see the writing on the wall and sent their R&D teams scuttling away into darkened rooms to come up with other solutions, while we all wait for the ratification of SATA Express. OCZ was one such company and its RevoDrive series of products do away with need for the SATA interface completely, using instead the PCI-E bus of the motherboard. This alternative has the potential to shift huge amounts of data really rapidly and deliver huge transfer rates.

There are two basic versions of the RevoDrive, the standard drive which has everything mounted on a single PCB and the X2 version which has a daughter card added with additional NAND modules and controllers. The RevoDrive 3 series sees the addition of some new technology to the drives in the shape of OCZ’s VCA 2.0 (Virtual Controller Architecture) and SuperScale Storage Accelerator which replace the RAID setup of the original RevoDrives.

OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 240GB PCI-E SSD
Next page: Sandforce sandwich

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Why should I pay for that security option? Hijacking only happens to planes

    But if I give him my bank details, I'll be rich!

    On Call Friday is here. We'd suggest an adult beverage or two to celebrate, but only if you BYOB. While you fill your suitcase, may we present an episode of On Call in which a reader saves his boss from a dunking.

    Our tale comes from a reader Regomised as "Ed" and is set earlier this century. Ed was working as a developer in a biotech lab. He rarely spoke to the director, but did speak to the director's personal assistant a lot.

    This PA was very much a jack of all trades (and master of... well, you get the drift). HR? He was in charge of that. Ops? That too. Anything technical? Of course. Heck, even though the firm had its very own bean counter, one had to go through the PA to get anything paid or budgets approved.

    Continue reading
  • UK, Australia, to build 'network of liberty that will deter cyber attacks before they happen'

    Enhanced 'Cyber and Critical Technology Partnership' will transport crime to harsh penal regime on the other side of the world

    The United Kingdom and Australia have signed a Cyber and Critical Technology Partnership that will, among other things, transport criminals to a harsh penal regime on the other side of the world.

    Australian foreign minister Marise Payne and UK foreign secretary Liz Truss yesterday inked the document in Sydney but haven't revealed the text of the pact.

    What we do know is that the two nations have pledged to "Increase deterrence by raising the costs for hostile state activity in cyberspace – including through strategic co-ordination of our cyber sanctions regimes." That's code for both nations adopting the same deterrents and punishments for online malfeasance so that malfeasants can't shop jurisdictions to find more lenient penalties.

    Continue reading
  • Japan's Supreme Court rules cryptojacking scripts are not malware

    Coinhive-slinger wins on appeal

    A man found guilty of using the Coinhive cryptojacking script to mine Monero on users' PCs while they browsed the web has been cleared by Japan's Supreme Court on the grounds that crypto mining software is not malware.

    Tokyo High Court ruled against the defendant, 34-year-old Seiya Moroi, on charges of keeping electromagnetic records of an unjust program. That unjust program was Coinhive, a "cryptojacking" script that mines for Monero by pinching some CPU cycles when users visit a web page that includes the code. Moroi ran the code on his website.

    Coinhive has been blocked by malware and antivirus vendors as it slows down other processes, increases utility bills, and creates wear and tear on your device. But in many ways Coinhive's Javascript code acts no differently to advertisements.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022