Money men want bombproof data centre on satellite site

Apollo radio site Jameson Earth Station slated for redevelopment by Oz company


Australian telecommunications company PlusComms is poised to acquire a piece of global telecommunications and space history as it seeks to raise capital for the purchase of the Jamesburg Earth Station.

Located in California's Carmel Valley, Jamesburg was built to assist the Apollo moon landings and until 2002 was a fully functional communications station operated by AT&T.

The Satellite Dish at the Jameson Earth Station

The relic has been on the market for some time with a price tag of just under US$3 million. For that wad of cash you get a house, barn, heliport, around 150 acres of land and a 97-foot satellite receiver with associated structures ... including a bunker.

You can peruse the real estate listing here.

The site has been in the hands of Silicon Valley entrepreneur Jeff Bullis for seven years. He originally purchased the property for $1.7 million and spent a further $2 million developing it.

Bullis has described the site as “great place for Armageddon" as he feels the above-ground bunker is “so strong that you couldn't knock it over with a five megaton nuclear blast,”

PlusComms founder and regional operations manager Robert Brand says that claim is "a bit wrong" but feels the site is sufficiently secure it is the ideal spot for an armageddon-proof data centre.

“We intend to build a tier 3.5 data centre with multicarrier fibre with diversity path and a backup multi-gigabit microwave link. The site is ideal as a backup site for government or companies and is away from the dangers of San Francisco and LA earthquakes, tsunamis and other disasters,” Brand told The Register.

Once the sale is completed, Brand expects the facility to be operational within the next 8-12 months depending on customer requirements.

“The dish needs repair, but our focus would be on separate satellite dishes for customers to provide communications to remote locations or in the case of a major disruption, we would be able to provide satellite comms by prior agreement,” he said.

The current investors for the proposed Jamesburg redevelopment include the current directors of PlusComms and, once capital raising is completed, they aim to be self-funded.

Brand said that once key customers are secured, the group would expand operations to fill the whole site and will use it as a base to develop its portfolio of mining and space technology ventures including a range of GPS tracking and navigation products for underground use targeting the mining sector and a global deep space network.

“We intend to turn the space, mining and tracking sectors on their heads when these products get to market. We are developing a number of new products that the world has never seen before - at least not with these abilities or prices,” he said. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Experts: AI should be recognized as inventors in patent law
    Plus: Police release deepfake of murdered teen in cold case, and more

    In-brief Governments around the world should pass intellectual property laws that grant rights to AI systems, two academics at the University of New South Wales in Australia argued.

    Alexandra George, and Toby Walsh, professors of law and AI, respectively, believe failing to recognize machines as inventors could have long-lasting impacts on economies and societies. 

    "If courts and governments decide that AI-made inventions cannot be patented, the implications could be huge," they wrote in a comment article published in Nature. "Funders and businesses would be less incentivized to pursue useful research using AI inventors when a return on their investment could be limited. Society could miss out on the development of worthwhile and life-saving inventions."

    Continue reading
  • Declassified and released: More secret files on US govt's emergency doomsday powers
    Nuke incoming? Quick break out the plans for rationing, censorship, property seizures, and more

    More papers describing the orders and messages the US President can issue in the event of apocalyptic crises, such as a devastating nuclear attack, have been declassified and released for all to see.

    These government files are part of a larger collection of records that discuss the nature, reach, and use of secret Presidential Emergency Action Documents: these are executive orders, announcements, and statements to Congress that are all ready to sign and send out as soon as a doomsday scenario occurs. PEADs are supposed to give America's commander-in-chief immediate extraordinary powers to overcome extraordinary events.

    PEADs have never been declassified or revealed before. They remain hush-hush, and their exact details are not publicly known.

    Continue reading
  • Stolen university credentials up for sale by Russian crooks, FBI warns
    Forget dark-web souks, thousands of these are already being traded on public bazaars

    Russian crooks are selling network credentials and virtual private network access for a "multitude" of US universities and colleges on criminal marketplaces, according to the FBI.

    According to a warning issued on Thursday, these stolen credentials sell for thousands of dollars on both dark web and public internet forums, and could lead to subsequent cyberattacks against individual employees or the schools themselves.

    "The exposure of usernames and passwords can lead to brute force credential stuffing computer network attacks, whereby attackers attempt logins across various internet sites or exploit them for subsequent cyber attacks as criminal actors take advantage of users recycling the same credentials across multiple accounts, internet sites, and services," the Feds' alert [PDF] said.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022