Assange's fate to be revealed at high noon

Argy bargy outside embassy after UK 'threatened' to haul out Wikileaker


Updated 1430 GMT Ecuador's Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño has reportedly told a press conference that Britain threatened to attack the nation’s London Embassy if it did not hand over WikiLeaker Julian Assange.

The threat was apparently made in writing. The document is not present on WikiLeaks at the time of writing. Assange is currently holed up in the embassy seeing political asylum.

Patiño also said that Ecuador will make known its decision about whether or not to offer asylum to Assange tomorrow at 0700 Ecuador time (noon GMT Thursday) - see the latest update below. The minister has since tweeted "Advertimos que se ha aumentado inexplicablemente presencia de policia británica alrededor de embajada ecuatoriana en Londres", which Google translates as "We note that inexplicably has increased police presence around British Ecuadorian embassy in London".

If the South American nation does offer Assange the chance to settle there, the Leaker-in-Chief has the problem of emerging from its London embassy and travelling to an airport without being arrested for breaching his bail conditions. Just how Assange, or his Ecuadorian hosts, propose to pull off that trick remains to be seen.

WikiLawyers are doubtless hard at work behind the scenes figuring it out.

Update at 0400 GMT

Many reports state an increased Police presence outside the Ecuadoran embassy. Whether the Police are there to detain Assange or as a response to protestors at the scene is not known.

WikiLeaks has issued a statement on the affair which calls for the UN to meet, caretaker Prime Minister William Hague to resign and for rainbow fields to be opened so unicorns can graze freely therein the UK to respect Ecuador's sovereignty and rights to offer asylum.

Update at 1430 GMT

Assange has been granted political asylum by Ecuador. "It is a significant victory for myself, and my people. Things will probably get more stressful now," the Wikileaker-in-chief said. The UK government said the move would not affect Blighty's obligation to extradite him to Sweden. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Meg Whitman – former HP and eBay CEO – nominated as US ambassador to Kenya

    Donated $110K to Democrats in recent years

    United States president Joe Biden has announced his intention to nominate former HPE and eBay CEO Meg Whitman as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the Republic of Kenya.

    The Biden administration's announcement of the planned nomination reminds us that Whitman has served as CEO of eBay, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Quibi. Whitman also serves on the boards of Procter & Gamble, and General Motors.

    The announcement doesn't remind readers that Whitman has form as a Republican politician – she ran for governor of California in 2010, then backed the GOP's Mitt Romney in his 2008 and 2012 bids for the presidency. She later switched political allegiance and backed the presidential campaigns of both Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden.

    Continue reading
  • Ex-Qualcomm Snapdragon chief turns CEO at AI chip startup MemryX

    Meet the new boss

    A former executive leading Qualcomm's Snapdragon computing platforms has departed the company to become CEO at an AI chip startup.

    Keith Kressin will lead product commercialization for MemryX, which was founded in 2019 and makes memory-intensive AI chiplets.

    The company is now out of stealth mode and will soon commercially ship its AI chips to non-tech customers. The company was testing early generations of its chips with industries including auto and robotics.

    Continue reading
  • Aircraft can't land safely due to interference with upcoming 5G C-band broadband service

    Expect flight delays and diversions, US Federal Aviation Administation warns

    The new 5G C-band wireless broadband service expected to rollout on 5 January 2022 in the US will disrupt local radio signals and make it difficult for airplanes to land safely in harsh weather conditions, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

    Pilots rely on radio altimeter readings to figure out when and where an aircraft should carry out a series of operations to prepare for touchdown. But the upcoming 5G C-band service beaming from cell towers threatens to interfere with these signals, the FAA warned in two reports.

    Flights may have to be delayed or restricted at certain airports as the new broadband service comes into effect next year. The change could affect some 6,834 airplanes and 1,828 helicopters. The cost to operators is expected to be $580,890.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021