AMD snubs hackers' tiny package, will fix raided blog

As perps turn fire on Philips' websites


AMD hopes to heave its blog back online soon after hackers broke into the site.

The chip fryer downplayed the attack, and said a small number of encrypted account passwords were lifted. The records were subsequently dumped online in a 32KB file by the blog raiders.

Nonetheless AMD has reset its scribes' login credentials as a precautionary measure, as a statement by the silicon biz explains:

AMD's blog site was the target of an attack on 19 August. We believe that the attackers posted less than 200 registered usernames and salted password hashes to a hacker web site. AMD uses salted password hashes, which is an industry best practice for encryption and extremely difficult to crack.

We immediately took the blog site offline and changed all passwords. AMD remains committed to data security and user privacy and has launched an investigation into this matter. We expect to bring our blog site back online within the next 24 hours.

Black-hat hacking crew r00tbeersec claimed responsibility for the break-in at AMD's WordPress-driven blog, and followed up the assault with a much bigger raid on Dutch technology giant Philips. The miscreants ransacked various websites run by the company, and made off with a thousand acount records containing names, telephone numbers, addresses, passwords and password hashes. One of the affected sites stored its passwords in plaintext.

Commentary on the Philips hack can be found in a blog post by Paul Ducklin of Sophos here.

The motives behind the attacks, and the methods used, on AMD and Philips remain unclear. ®

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