Rovio sticks some Martian action into Angry Birds Space

Plonks Curiosity where no rover has gone before...


For possibly no other reason than it hasn't had any other fantastic ideas lately, Rovio Entertainment has updated its Angry Birds Space app to include the Martian terrain.

It's all about Mars over at NASA these days, what with the Curiosity finally tootling about the planet and the agency's Jet Propulsion Lab bagging some cash for its next Martian mission, InSight, which will drill under the surface to learn more about the planet's geology.

Inevitably, Rovio has jumped on this bandwagon with some new settings for its ever-popular game Angry Birds. In the Space version of the bird-flinging app, users got microgravity as part of the play and now gamers will see NASA rovers and landers featured.

The only saving grace to unashamed coat-tail riding antics of Rovio is that the game is educational, linking into NASA web content about Mars exploration and its missions.

"It's a great way to introduce both kids and adults to the wonders of the planet in a fun and entertaining way," David Weaver, associate administrator for communications at NASA HQ, said in a canned statement. ®

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