Vodafone phone and mobe biz service goes titsup

Hello? Hello? Is anyone there?


Vodafone's One Net service has gone down, leaving businesses with no working phones.

The service, which merges landlines with mobiles so finger-on-the-pulse folk can pick up their calls anywhere no matter which number customers call in on, has been down for about an hour.

A Reg reader told us that the outage had knackered fixed and mobile phones, while angry twitterers said:

Just last week Vodafone's website was down for an hour and online account access was impossible for a day, but the telco said that was due to "planned maintenance". The middle of the day seemed to be an odd time for tweaking systems, but Voda said August is "traditionally the quietest time of the year".

The telco wasn't immediately able to comment on the latest outage, but promised to get back to The Register. We'll update this piece if it does. ®


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