Ten digital radios to suit all budgets

Tunesmiths and stream catchers


Pure Sensia 200D

RH Numbers

The newest of Pure’s egg-shaped Sensia series does so much you almost forget it’s a DAB radio too. There’s Wi-Fi for internet stations and streaming from networked storage or Pure Music, which resembles a Spotify/iTunes hybrid. The excellent Shazam-based radio song tagging system is also here, as well as MP3 recording onto USB. It’s ready for a ‘dockless’ future by streaming from mobiles with an iOS/Android app, and you can add a rechargeable battery for portability.

The touchscreen interface improves substantially on the original Sensia, though its sophistication can get the better of it, as it’s not without the occasional glitch. The stereo audio quality is clear and distortion free and, if you really need it, there's an aux input too.

Pure Sensia 200D digital radio

Reg Rating 80%
Price £250
More info Pure

Roberts RecordR

RH Numbers

The Roberts RecordR has conventional looks, even going as far as an old-style ‘tone' control below the volume knob. If you want to take it away from the mains, it also takes four standard D-cell batteries. Its main feature is the ability to pause, rewind or record from the FM or DAB tuners, PVR style.

It can record the current programme or be set by timer, which is all done onto an SD card in MP2 format. An SD card can also be used for playing MP3, WAV, WMA and AAC files. This could all be more user friendly, however, and the sound quality is well below average as the speaker distorts at even medium volume.

Roberts RecordR digital radio

Reg Rating 40%
Price £100
More info Roberts

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Ryzen shines with remote management on Qualcomm Wi-Fi kit
    Working to compete with Intel as FastConnect comes to AMD-processor-powered PCs

    AMD and Qualcomm have rolled out a joint effort that brings remote management capabilities over Wi-Fi for AMD business systems, potentially boosting their appeal for corporate IT departments.

    The two companies said they were working together to improve Qualcomm's FastConnect wireless kit for AMD compute platforms based on the Ryzen chips for desktops and laptops. The starting point for this is AMD Ryzen-powered business laptops using Qualcomm's FastConnect 6900 system that delivers Wi-Fi 6 and 6E plus Bluetooth 5.3, supporting Wi-Fi connection speeds up to 3.6Gbps.

    Remote management is enabled by the combination of the AMD Manageability Processor now embedded in Ryzen PRO 6000 systems and the FastConnect 6900 system, AMD and Qualcomm said, with support for the DASH client management standard developed by the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF).

    Continue reading
  • Qualcomm sampling Wi-Fi 7 silicon for next-gen access points
    OEMs able to develop new products with aim of 10Gbps-plus throughput

    Qualcomm is sampling its Wi-Fi 7 Networking Pro Series chips aimed at throughput of more than 10Gbps for enterprise access points, gateways, and premium home routers.

    The third generation of the chipmaker's Networking Pro Series platforms is set to "initiate a new era" of 10Gbps Wi-Fi, Qualcomm claimed, stating that the new portfolio is optimized for multi-user environments and low CPU utilization to power collaboration, telepresence, and metaverse applications for both home and enterprise environments.

    Sampling means that the Networking Pro silicon is available to Qualcomm's OEM customers so they can develop and test the Wi-Fi 7 products that will ship to end users at some point. It isn't clear when buyers will actually be able to get their hands on kit to deploy, although Qualcomm previously said it expects to see Wi-Fi 7 products hit the market in 2023.

    Continue reading
  • Wi-Fi 6E unaffected by chip shortages, claims Wi-Fi Alliance
    Move along, people. Nothing to see here. Go home

    Businesses shouldn't wait for Wi-Fi 7 networking kit when Wi-Fi 6E can give them significant advantages today.

    So says the Wi-Fi Alliance, which disputes the message coming from parts of the industry that Wi-Fi 6E will only see limited adoption because of supply chain issues that might cause buyers to hold off until Wi-Fi 7 is available. Some netizens and organizations have lately complained it can take six months, a year, or more for Wi-Fi 6E equipment they ordered to arrive.

    Wi-Fi 6E builds on Wi-Fi 6, which was finalized as the 802.11ax standard in 2019, saw early products in 2020, and started to be widely adopted in 2021. Wi-Fi 6E is essentially the same, but adds the ability to use frequencies in the 6GHz portion of the wireless spectrum as well as the existing 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands. It follows moves by regulators in the US and elsewhere to open up the 6GHz spectrum for Wi-Fi use.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022