That horrendous iPhone empurplement - you're holding it wrong

'Grip your digital tool correctly, all will be well'


ALL iPhones put a purple flare on photos they take, Apple has admitted, but only if they are held incorrectly.

The tech giant has responded to complaints that snaps are marred by a thistle-tinted haze - but blamed incompetent fanbois rather than coughing to a hardware fault.

Punters experiencing purple flares, hazes and spots on their iPhone snaps have been grumbling on the company's support forums for the past few days - suggesting that the problem was new and affected the recently unveiled iPhone 5 and iOS 6 operating system. Apple took the relatively unusual step of posting a response in the gripe boards, saying the all iPhones suffer flare trouble and that it was largely the users' fault for trying to take photos too near a light source:

Most small cameras, including those in every generation of iPhone, may exhibit some form of flare at the edge of the frame when capturing an image with out-of-scene light sources. This can happen when a light source is positioned at an angle (usually just outside the field of view) so that it causes a reflection off the surfaces inside the camera module and onto the camera sensor.

Apple said iPhone owners can end their purple rage by cupping their mobe in their hands or just stop holding it the wrong way:

Moving the camera slightly to change the position at which the bright light is entering the lens, or shielding the lens with your hand, should minimize or eliminate the effect.

The issue was described by users as a "purplish or other colored flare, haze, or spot", and it appears when photos are taken with bright light sources just out-of-scene. ®


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