'Small' upheaval at McAfee, not many fired

The guy who knows how many, we already sacked him


Intel-owned security firm McAfee is planning to lay off some of its 7,000-strong global workforce, a company spokesman in the US has said.

The No 2 maker of antivirus software would not give any further details about the planned redundancies, only admitting that a "small percentage" of staff would be axed.

The US spokesman confirmed the job losses after a Reuters report suggested staff would be let go. A McAfee spokeswoman in the UK told The Register: "We have no further comment to add."

With interest in traditional personal computers waning worldwide, software firms that offer desktop protection against malware are suffering. Rival Symantec is already in the middle of one of those "strategic reviews", kicked off by shiny new chief Steve Bennett, who took the reins in July after the board ousted CEO Enrique Salem.

Intel agreed to snap up McAfee in August 2010 for $7.7bn, the biggest purchase in Chipzilla's history.

The processor maker, due to report quarterly earnings on 16 October, warned last month that revenue would be less than it previously predicted. ®

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