Riverbed to slurp Opnet for cool $1 billion

Management software, comfort food for a tough economy


Network gear manufacturer Riverbed Technology is about to slurp software firm Opnet Technologies for a cool $1bn.

Opnet's software manages traffic on networks, an area of the industry that has held steadier than orders for network hardware.

Like everyone else in the world, telcos are tightening their belts and waiting for the global turnaround to start feeling a lot more like it's actually happening before spending any big money on network gear. But network management software is still doing well as the telcos try to milk the most out of their Wide Area Networks.

Riverbed already has WAN optimisation products but adding Opnet stuff will strengthen the firm in that market.

The network company said it hoped to close the acquisition by the end of this year. With Opnet on board, Riverbed is expecting its 2013 revenue to exceed $1bn.

“The addition of Opnet establishes Riverbed as the clear leader in the high-growth and converging application and network performance management markets,” Jerry Kennelly, chief of Riverbed, said in a canned statement. “This acquisition also transforms Riverbed into a billion dollar revenue company." ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • UK police to spend tens of millions on legacy comms network kit
    More evidence of where that half-a-billion-a-year cost of Emergency Services Network delay is going

    The UK's police service is set to spend up to £50 million ($62.7 million) buying hardware and software for a legacy communication network that was planned to become obsolete in 2019.

    The Home Office had planned to replace the Airwave secure emergency communication system, which launched in 2000, with a more advanced Emergency Services Network by the close of the decade. However, the legacy network has seen its life extended as its replacement was beset with delays. The ESN is expected to go live in 2026.

    In a procurement notice, the Police Digital Service (PDS) said it was looking for up to three suppliers of Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) Encryption Algorithm 2 (TEA2) compatible radio devices – including handheld, desktop, and mobile terminals – as well as software, accessories, services, and maintenance for use on the UK Airwave system.

    Continue reading
  • Cisco execs pledge simpler, more integrated networks
    Is this the end of Switchzilla's dashboard creep?

    Cisco Live In his first in-person Cisco Live keynote in two years, CEO Chuck Robbins didn't make any lofty claims about how AI is taking over the network or how the company's latest products would turn networking on its head. Instead, the presentation was all about working with customers to make their lives easier.

    "We need to simplify the things that we do with you. If I think back to eight or ten years ago, I think we've made progress, but we still have more to do," he said, promising to address customers' biggest complaints with the networking giant's various platforms.

    "Everything we find that is inhibiting your experience from being the best that it can be, we're going to tackle," he declared, appealing to customers to share their pain points at the show.

    Continue reading
  • IT downtime not itself going down, power failures most common cause
    2022 in a nutshell: Missing SLAs, failing to meet customer expectations

    Infrastructure operators are struggling to reduce the rate of IT outages despite improving technology and strong investment in this area.

    The Uptime Institute's 2022 Outage Analysis Report says that progress toward reducing downtime has been mixed. Investment in cloud technologies and distributed resiliency has helped to reduce the impact of site-level failures, for example, but has also added complexity. A growing number of incidents are being attributed to network, software or systems issues because of this intricacy.

    The authors make it clear that critical IT systems are far more reliable than they once were, thanks to many decades of improvement. However, data covering 2021 and 2022 indicates that unscheduled downtime is continuing at a rate that is not significantly reduced from previous years.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022