Littlest pirate’s Winnie-the-Pooh laptop on the way home

10-year-old Finnish girl’s Dad settles with Big Content


The ten-year-old girl accused of piracy in Finland will probably still find it hard to stay off Santa’s naughty list, but has at least cost her family only €300 after attempting to pinch a Finnish pop song.

Big Content, in the form of the Finnish Copyright Information and Anti-Piracy Centre (CIAPC), was last week revealed to have issued a demand for €600 from the Nylund family, in order to compensate recording artist Chisu for the theft and distribution of his work.

The family was raided and the girl’s laptop, complete with Winnie-the-Pooh stickers, was confiscated.

Torrent Freak reports the laptop’s now on the way home after the story went both viral and global, leading to widespread opining that CIAPC may have chosen the nuclear option when a little sabre rattling would have done just fine.

The girl’s father reportedly met CIAPC in the middle with his €300 offer and the case is now considered closed, with the laptop heading home. CIAPC has declared itself happy a settlement has been reached, but unease about the way in which a child has been targeted persists. ®


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