Looking closely at HP's object storage: Questions Answered

Object of desire, or just access method?


Q+A Looking closely at HP's StoreServ and StoreAll announcements at HP Discover we wondered if the object storage was simply an object access method layered on the base StoreAll file system. It isn't, being a real object deal as the Q and A session below shows.

We talked to Patrick Osborne, the Director of Product Management in HP's Storage Division, and asked him a set of questions to learn more about HP's new object storage capability.

El Reg: Is StoreAll object storage an object access method (StoreAll REST API) layered on top of StoreAll file storage?

Patrick Osborne: The StoreAll REST API is an object access layer that provides the ability to ingest and retrieve objects in 2 modes, file-compatibility mode and bucket/GUID mode.

El Reg: There isn't an object storage technology being used in StoreAll. Instead objects are stored in the file system as files or as parts of files.

Patrick Osborne: The StoreAll REST API in bucket/key mode is object storage technology. This allows a user to define an account, create buckets and “PUT” objects into buckets. After an object “PUT”, the web method returns a key or “GUID”, which is a unique identifier. This type of account/bucket/key technology is specific to object storage and allows applications to avoid optimizing hierarchical filesystem taxonomies.

El Reg: Does the StoreAll REST API enable object search to use the Express Query facility?

Patrick Osborne: The StoreAll REST API provides the ability to do many data services. In addition to using it for data ingest and retrieval for the Object API, it allows for the out-of-band query of the Express Query database, setting data retention properties and custom metadata tagging.

El Reg: I believe that the current StoreAll O/S is v6.1 and the REST API is coming in v6.3, two point releases away. When is v6.3 due please?

Patrick Osborne: The announcement today covered StoreAll v6.2 and v6.3. The v6.3 will be available at the end of February 2013 and includes some enhancements to the object API and Express Query performance improvements.

El Reg: Will the StoreAll REST API be extended to StoreServ so that the 3PAR systems can be used for object storage as well as block, and now file, storage?

Patrick Osborne: The convergence of block, object and file on HP’s primary storage architecture is a key requirement that we see for our customers. The StoreAll 9300 Gateway is available with all 3PAR models and will be able to provide object storage capabilities with [the] release of StoreAll v6.3.

El Reg: Will it be extended also to the XP (OEM'd Hitachi storage) and LeftHand P4000 storage systems?

Patrick Osborne: The current StoreAll technology is focused today on the StoreAll 9730, 9320, 9300 and 3PAR platforms. Future support for additional HP platforms is in the product lifecycle planning phase. ®

Similar topics

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • It's 2022 and there are still malware-laden PDFs in emails exploiting bugs from 2017
    Crafty file names, encrypted malicious code, Office flaws – ah, it's like the Before Times

    HP's cybersecurity folks have uncovered an email campaign that ticks all the boxes: messages with a PDF attached that embeds a Word document that upon opening infects the victim's Windows PC with malware by exploiting a four-year-old code-execution vulnerability in Microsoft Office.

    Booby-trapping a PDF with a malicious Word document goes against the norm of the past 10 years, according to the HP Wolf Security researchers. For a decade, miscreants have preferred Office file formats, such as Word and Excel, to deliver malicious code rather than PDFs, as users are more used to getting and opening .docx and .xlsx files. About 45 percent of malware stopped by HP's threat intelligence team in the first quarter of the year leveraged Office formats.

    "The reasons are clear: users are familiar with these file types, the applications used to open them are ubiquitous, and they are suited to social engineering lures," Patrick Schläpfer, malware analyst at HP, explained in a write-up, adding that in this latest campaign, "the malware arrived in a PDF document – a format attackers less commonly use to infect PCs."

    Continue reading
  • Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway buys 11.4% stake in HP
    Even notoriously tech averse stock market gambler can't resist piece of pandemic-boosted PC extravaganza

    Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has taken up a double-digit stake in PC and print biz HP Inc's stock worth about $4.2 billion, a move that sent the company's share price up by 10 percent.

    The purchase, confirmed in a SEC filing by the investment vehicle on 6 April, saw roughly 121 million HP shares shift over to the new owner in what can be seen as a vote of confidence in the residual value of HP. This equates to a circa 11.4 percent ownership of the company.

    "Berkshire Hathaway is one of the world's most respected investors and we welcome them as an investor in HP," the world's largest printer and second largest PC brand said.

    Continue reading
  • HP bets big on future of hybrid work with $3.3bn Poly buy
    Plantronics and Polycom have a new parent company

    HP Inc sees the future of its business as one supporting a workforce partially based at home and partially in the office, and appears to have bought office telecom giant Poly for that reason.

    Formerly known as Plantronics, Poly changed its name shortly after it acquired Polycom in 2018. HP didn't mention in its acquisition announcement whether or not it would keep the Poly brand separate, but it's still early: the deal is not expected to close until the end of the 2022 calendar year. 

    HP described the $3.3 billion purchase ($40 per share) as a bid to refocus its portfolio on growth and take advantage of what it said is a massive growth opportunity due to the likely permanence of hybrid work. 

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022