Swedish teens GO BERSERK in Instagram sex pic slut riot

City trashed after web slurs, dodgy filters enrage kids


Swedish kids rioted and blockaded a school after someone put photos of Gothenburg's teens on Instagram and tagged them as "sluts".

Children as young as 13 were so offended by the online slur that they formed a mob to hunt down a 17-year-old girl believed to be responsible for the controversial Instagram account. Police cordoned off streets and cuffed 27 youths during the ensuing violence in the city.

The crowd surrounded the Plusgymnasiet high school where they thought the photo uploader was studying. According to the Gothenburg Post, the tearaways threw stones, jumped on cars, and clashed with cops called in by the authorities.

Rioting spread to a nearby shopping mall and several streets were blocked to end the riot.

"The protesters are kicking down lampposts and jumping on cars," an eyewitness told the newspaper Aftonbladet. "They're going berserk."

The trouble started when an anonymous Instagram user issued a "slut request", asked where they could be found in the city, and promised anonymity for anyone sending in pictures of them. At least 200 photos of boys and girls were submitted and reposted by the account, each captioned with details of their alleged sex lives and tagged #slut or #whore.

The number of people following the account ballooned to 8,000. According to The Local, the Instagram account was shut down but online outrage over the photos spread to a Facebook page and rumours of who was responsible for the tagging flew around the web.

Instagram's terms of use state that users must not post "nude, partially nude, or sexually suggestive photos". It also says that "you must not abuse, harass, threaten, impersonate or intimidate other Instagram users". We have have asked Instagram for a comment. ®

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