AWS puts sysadmins on call everywhere, all the time

Android app lets you measure cloudy bulges in your pocket


Amazon Web Services has built an app capable of driving its cloudy services from an Android device.

The Amazon team has clearly ordered every volume of poetry on offer in the company's online bookstore to come up with the app's name: “The Amazon Web Services (AWS) Management Console for Android”.

For now, the app can tackle the following tasks:

  • "View a summary of your Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances, Amazon CloudWatch alarms, total service charges, and AWS Service Health status.
  • Filter and search for EC2 instances and CloudWatch alarms.
  • View EC2 instance metrics and status checks that show the state of your environment.
  • Stop or reboot your EC2 instances.
  • List CloudWatch alarms by status and time.
  • View CloudWatch graphs to instantly gauge the health of your resources and identify trends for key indicators.
  • See what automated actions are configured for each alarm setting.
  • Jump from a CloudWatch alarm to the affected EC2 instance for additional metrics.
  • View detailed AWS service health status, including recent AWS service events and notifications.
  • Change regions to view your resources world-wide.
  • Switch users to see resources in multiple accounts."

Interestingly, AWS advises against using the mobile device on which you wield the app as the device you use for multi-factor authentication. If you use that method of logging in, the cloudy concern counsels you to obtain “a separate mobile device for the greatest level of account protection.”

That instruction leaves sysadmins with servers running in the Realm of Bezos facing the wonderful prospect of carrying two Android devices (or one Android device and a hard token) at all times, so they can enjoy all the anxiety that will surely come with the chance to check on the status of cloud servers said to be so reliable you don't really need to worry about administering them anyway.

AWS' Android cloud management app

Oh joy: now you can watch your cloud on your mobe

To be fair, the chance to access the console from a tablet does seem a useful use case around the office.

But users confronted with a problem will still need to head to a proper PC if their cloudy kit is in trouble. Other potentially useful functions for use on the go – such as the ability to quickly fire up additional instances in the event of a traffic spike – are currently missing from the app. AWS plans more features in the future.

Feel free to use the comments to let us know if you're keen to put a cloud management tool in your pocket, or to let us know the boss's hands have no place whatsoever in your trousers. ®

Similar topics

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise adds Wi-Fi 6E to 'premium' access points
    Company claims standard will improve performance in dense environments

    Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise is the latest networking outfit to add Wi-Fi 6E capability to its hardware, opening up access to the less congested 6GHz spectrum for business users.

    The France-based company just revealed the OmniAccess Stellar 14xx series of wireless access points, which are set for availability from this September. Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise said its first Wi-Fi 6E device will be a high-end "premium" Access Point and will be followed by a mid-range product by the end of the year.

    Wi-Fi 6E is compatible with the Wi-Fi 6 standard, but adds the ability to use channels in the 6GHz portion of the spectrum, a feature that will be built into the upcoming Wi-Fi 7 standard from the start. This enables users to reduce network contention, or so the argument goes, as the 6GHz portion of the spectrum is less congested with other traffic than the existing 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequencies used for Wi-Fi access.

    Continue reading
  • Will Lenovo ever think beyond hardware?
    Then again, why develop your own software à la HPE GreenLake when you can use someone else's?

    Analysis Lenovo fancies its TruScale anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform as a more flexible competitor to HPE GreenLake or Dell Apex. Unlike its rivals, Lenovo doesn't believe it needs to mimic all aspects of the cloud to be successful.

    While subscription services are nothing new for Lenovo, the company only recently consolidated its offerings into a unified XaaS service called TruScale.

    On the surface TruScale ticks most of the XaaS boxes — cloud-like consumption model, subscription pricing — and it works just like you'd expect. Sign up for a certain amount of compute capacity and a short time later a rack full of pre-plumbed compute, storage, and network boxes are delivered to your place of choosing, whether that's a private datacenter, colo, or edge location.

    Continue reading
  • Intel is running rings around AMD and Arm at the edge
    What will it take to loosen the x86 giant's edge stranglehold?

    Analysis Supermicro launched a wave of edge appliances using Intel's newly refreshed Xeon-D processors last week. The launch itself was nothing to write home about, but a thought occurred: with all the hype surrounding the outer reaches of computing that we call the edge, you'd think there would be more competition from chipmakers in this arena.

    So where are all the AMD and Arm-based edge appliances?

    A glance through the catalogs of the major OEMs – Dell, HPE, Lenovo, Inspur, Supermicro – returned plenty of results for AMD servers, but few, if any, validated for edge deployments. In fact, Supermicro was the only one of the five vendors that even offered an AMD-based edge appliance – which used an ageing Epyc processor. Hardly a great showing from AMD. Meanwhile, just one appliance from Inspur used an Arm-based chip from Nvidia.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022