Adobe muzzles TWO zero-day wild things with emergency Flash patches

Critical block for active Win and Mac attacks

13 Reg comments Got Tips?

Updated Adobe published a critical Flash Player update on Thursday that fixes not just one but two zero-day flaws, both under active attack by hackers.

Both Windows and Mac users are in the firing line. One of the vulnerabilities (CVE-2013-0633) is being harnessed in targeted attacks designed to trick marks into opening a Microsoft Word document email attachment that contains malicious Flash (SWF) content. The exploit targets the ActiveX version of Flash Player on Windows.

The second vulnerability (CVE-2013-0634) is designed to attack Safari and Firefox browser users on Macs. The assault involves malicious Flash (SWF) content delivered by a drive-by download-style attack from booby-trapped websites. The second vulnerability is also being abused to hack Windows machines using malicious Word attachments, again featuring malicious Flash content.

Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.5.502.146 and earlier for Windows and Macintosh should update to Adobe Flash Player 11.5.502.149, as explained in an emergency bulletin by Adobe. The updates also cover Flash on Linux and for Android smartphones - although the need to update on those instances is not as pressing.

Users of Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 10 will get built-in Flash components updates automatically from Google and Microsoft, respectively.

Early indications don't shed much light on who is being attacked in the wild but the seriousness of the flaws and the potential for harm is beyond doubt. Exploitation of flaws in Adobe Flash, along with Java flaws, browser vulnerabilities and PDF exploits are among the most prevalent hacking tactics and have been for at least a couple of years. It's worth going through Adobe's irksome update process to apply these fixes. Patch now or risk getting pwned later. ®

Update: Exploit used to target aerospace industry

Security tools firm AlienVault reports that Microsoft Office files containing the exploit have cropped up in an spearphishing campaign targeting businesses in the aerospace industry, among others. One of these files uses an 2013 IEEE Aerospace Conference schedule as a lure.

Another sample containing the exploit is themed around information about an online payroll system that's primarily used in the US.

In both cases the booby-trapped Word .doc files contain an embedded flash file with no compression or obfuscation.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER


Keep Reading

WTF PDF: If at first you don't succeed, you may be Adobe re-patching its Acrobat, Reader patches

Plus: How Microsoft Edge helps Facebook Flash files dodge click-to-play rules in Edge

This may shock you but Adobe is shipping insecure software. No, it's not Flash this time. Nope, not Acrobat, either

Mobile app SDKs sport dodgy crypto defaults, set bad examples – updates available

With no viable alternatives, big names flock to Adobe's cloudy wares amid global pandemic

The new normal is all right for some

Dear Adobe, Trend Micro users: Please vaccinate your software – at least some of these security holes were exploited in the wild

Genuine Integrity doesn't exactly live up to its name

Adobe kills off Advertising Cloud, notes pause in enterprise spending, but is weathering COVID-19 crisis

Sales miss Wall Street forecasts by $300m, share price dips 4.7%

We spent way too long on this Microsoft, Intel, Adobe, SAP, Red Hat Patch Tuesday article. Just click on it, pretend to read it, apply updates

Patch Tuesday Please, thanks, good show, cheers, ta

It's powered by a mega-corp AI, it has a Liquid Mode, but it's not a T-1000. It's Adobe's PDF auto-reflow for mobile

If you find yourself wrestling with big docs on small screens, Photoshop maker's iOS, Android apps may be able to help

Sure is quiet from Adobe. No security fixes this month? Great job. Oh no, wait, what's that stampede sound...

If you thought Reader, Acrobat, Experience Manager were skipping October's Patch Tuesday, think again

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020