Playmobil punts bank-heist set to wide-eyed kiddies

Should actually be the bank robbing the punter


El Reg's fave toy manufacturer Playmobil has provoked a miniature rumpus by punting a bank-heist set to children.

The Playmobil bank set, complete with armed robber

The "Bank with Safe" ensemble boasts a working cash machine although nippers are encouraged to make over-the-counter withdrawals via a pistol-waving blonde blagger - something hard-pressed parents may appreciate after stumping 40 quid for this box of shoot-'em-up entertainment.

Anyone wishing to choke on their morning coffee at the outrage is directed to the Daily Mail, where Danny Bryan of Communities Against Gun and Knife Crime thundered: "We don’t want to be encouraging young people to look at these sorts of things. I think it is horrendous that young people are given all these images to shape them. It is sending out the wrong message."

The Mail notes that Playmobil's previous form for corrupting delighting children includes knocking out "construction worker play sets which come complete with shovels, tools and three crates of what appears to be beer".

In light of this latest brouhaha, we presume the German manufacturer has cancelled any plans it may have had for a CIA water-boarding facility and the Ciudad Juárez drug cartel gun battle set, although it may well press ahead with a Paul Gascoigne rehab clinic and French horse meat burger-making factory. ®

Bootnote

Our own Playmobil tomfoolery can be found right here (warning: contains firearms, sex, violence, etc, etc).

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Despite global uncertainty, $500m hit doesn't rattle Nvidia execs
    CEO acknowledges impact of war, pandemic but says fundamentals ‘are really good’

    Nvidia is expecting a $500 million hit to its global datacenter and consumer business in the second quarter due to COVID lockdowns in China and Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Despite those and other macroeconomic concerns, executives are still optimistic about future prospects.

    "The full impact and duration of the war in Ukraine and COVID lockdowns in China is difficult to predict. However, the impact of our technology and our market opportunities remain unchanged," said Jensen Huang, Nvidia's CEO and co-founder, during the company's first-quarter earnings call.

    Those two statements might sound a little contradictory, including to some investors, particularly following the stock selloff yesterday after concerns over Russia and China prompted Nvidia to issue lower-than-expected guidance for second-quarter revenue.

    Continue reading
  • Another AI supercomputer from HPE: Champollion lands in France
    That's the second in a week following similar system in Munich also aimed at researchers

    HPE is lifting the lid on a new AI supercomputer – the second this week – aimed at building and training larger machine learning models to underpin research.

    Based at HPE's Center of Excellence in Grenoble, France, the new supercomputer is to be named Champollion after the French scholar who made advances in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs in the 19th century. It was built in partnership with Nvidia using AMD-based Apollo computer nodes fitted with Nvidia's A100 GPUs.

    Champollion brings together HPC and purpose-built AI technologies to train machine learning models at scale and unlock results faster, HPE said. HPE already provides HPC and AI resources from its Grenoble facilities for customers, and the broader research community to access, and said it plans to provide access to Champollion for scientists and engineers globally to accelerate testing of their AI models and research.

    Continue reading
  • Workday nearly doubles losses as waves of deals pushed back
    Figures disappoint analysts as SaaSy HR and finance application vendor navigates economic uncertainty

    HR and finance application vendor Workday's CEO, Aneel Bhusri, confirmed deal wins expected for the three-month period ending April 30 were being pushed back until later in 2022.

    The SaaS company boss was speaking as Workday recorded an operating loss of $72.8 million in its first quarter [PDF] of fiscal '23, nearly double the $38.3 million loss recorded for the same period a year earlier. Workday also saw revenue increase to $1.43 billion in the period, up 22 percent year-on-year.

    However, the company increased its revenue guidance for the full financial year. It said revenues would be between $5.537 billion and $5.557 billion, an increase of 22 percent on earlier estimates.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022