US woman cuffed for 'booking strippers for 16th birthday bash'

'Intimate' entertainment endangered teen welfare, cops claim


A New York woman is in a spot of bother after allegedly arranging for strippers to liven up a young man's 16th birthday bash.

The District Attorney said charges of endangering the welfare of a child had been laid against Judy Viger, 33, of Gansevoort, north of Albany, in connection with allegations that she had hired two scantily clad women to entertain an 80-strong crowd of revellers in a private room at the Spare Time Bowling Center in South Glens Falls last November.

Cops first investigated the revelry when snaps of the event popped up on social media websites in November. Police cuffed Viger on Monday after a three-month investigation. She's charged with five counts of "endangering the welfare of a child", as Saratoga County District Attorney James Murphy explained.

The company which supplied the strippers, Tops in Bottoms, "cooperated fully with their investigation and does not face any charges", the NY Daily News notes. The firm suggested the matter had been "blown out of proportion".

Viger is due up before the beak on 7 March. If she's found guilty of "knowingly acting in a manner likely to be injurious to the physical, mental or moral welfare of a child younger than 17", she could face a maximum of 12 months in county jail. ®


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