Boffin road trip! The Reg presents Geek's Guide to Britain

Brains that made Britain exposed, mapped and viewed


Geek's Guide to Britain Which country is credited with designing more than half of the world’s most important inventions. Is it Germany, home of the VW? Japan, birthplace of the Walkman? The US, land of NASA and Google? No: Britain.

Scientists, engineers, architects and inventors in Britain have made their mark on the world with trains, jet engines, TVs and the internet, while they've also achieved major breakthroughs in the fields of electricity and medicine.

Brainboxes have made their mark on the British landscape, too, chucking up suspension bridges, radar stations and huge flood barriers while companies like BT operate some of the world’s largest technology design and testing facilities in this country.

To celebrate these and more, The Reg is pleased to announce its Geek's Guide to Britain. From places of invention and creation past and present, from lost gems to sites of technological wonder, from functioning facilities to hidden museums, The Reg's new series will map Britain’s places of technological, scientific and engineering wonder.

And, because geeks cannot live on technology alone, our writers will also report back on those soft comforts that take the edge off travel: the restaurants, pubs, cafes and other places of interest, including various factors such as level of kid-friendliness, to help make an excursion a fully rounded and enjoyable experience for all. We’ll give you everything you'll need to plan your visit, from a day out, weekend trip or stop en-route to the in-laws to a proper excursion.

Geeks Guide to Britain kicks off next week with four handy guides. We start off with Jodrell Bank, the astrophysics and astronomy research hub that's the backdrop to the Beeb's Stargazing LIVE. Jodrell is home to the iconic Lovell Telescope, once the largest fully steerable radio telescope and an installation that played a role in the Cold War. Six decades on, you can tour the 'scope on its mission to probe the universe.

Also next week we go behind the scenes at BT's Adastral Park research shop in Suffolk, we remember the Lyons Elecronic Office in Hammersmith - which put Britain in the lead on business computing - and we visit the RAF Air Defence Radar Museum, on the frontline of nuclear annihilation in Norfolk.

So dust off the GPS, fire up Google Maps and join The Reg’s Geek's Guide to Britain for a geeky potter around our nation's sci-tech hotspots. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Pentester pops open Tesla Model 3 using low-cost Bluetooth module
    Anything that uses proximity-based BLE is vulnerable, claim researchers

    Tesla Model 3 and Y owners, beware: the passive entry feature on your vehicle could potentially be hoodwinked by a relay attack, leading to the theft of the flash motor.

    Discovered and demonstrated by researchers at NCC Group, the technique involves relaying the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) signals from a smartphone that has been paired with a Tesla back to the vehicle. Far from simply unlocking the door, this hack lets a miscreant start the car and drive away, too.

    Essentially, what happens is this: the paired smartphone should be physically close by the Tesla to unlock it. NCC's technique involves one gadget near the paired phone, and another gadget near the car. The phone-side gadget relays signals from the phone to the car-side gadget, which forwards them to the vehicle to unlock and start it. This shouldn't normally happen because the phone and car are so far apart. The car has a defense mechanism – based on measuring transmission latency to detect that a paired device is too far away – that ideally prevents relayed signals from working, though this can be defeated by simply cutting the latency of the relay process.

    Continue reading
  • Google assuring open-source code to secure software supply chains
    Java and Python packages are the first on the list

    Google has a plan — and a new product plus a partnership with developer-focused security shop Snyk — that attempts to make it easier for enterprises to secure their open source software dependencies.

    The new service, announced today at the Google Cloud Security Summit, is called Assured Open Source Software. We're told it will initially focus on some Java and Python packages that Google's own developers prioritize in their workflows. 

    These two programming languages have "particularly high-risk profiles," Google Cloud Cloud VP and GM Sunil Potti said in response to The Register's questions. "Remember Log4j?" Yes, quite vividly.

    Continue reading
  • Rocket Lab is taking NASA's CAPSTONE to the Moon
    Mission to lunar orbit is further than any Photon satellite bus has gone before

    Rocket Lab has taken delivery of NASA's CAPSTONE spacecraft at its New Zealand launch pad ahead of a mission to the Moon.

    It's been quite a journey for CAPSTONE [Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment], which was originally supposed to launch from Rocket Lab's US launchpad at Wallops Island in Virginia.

    The pad, Launch Complex 2, has been completed for a while now. However, delays in certifying Rocket Lab's Autonomous Flight Termination System (AFTS) pushed the move to Launch Complex 1 in Mahia, New Zealand.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022