Verizon Terremark backs Xen-CloudStack combo for clouds

Can you hear me now, VMware ESXi and vCloud?


Hot on the heels of the open source Xen hypervisor being moved over to the Linux Foundation as an official collaborative project, Citrix Systems, which has controlled the Xen community as well as the open source CloudStack cloud controller that is one of the viable alternatives to OpenStack, has scored the Terremark cloud subsidiary of telco giant Verizon as an enthusiastic backer of both Xen and CloudStack.

The news about Xen and CloudStack comes right smack dab in the middle of the OpenStack Summit, which is going on in Portland, Oregon this week, and that is no doubt not an accident.

The announcement by Terremark was made in a blog post by Chris Drumgoole, senior vice president of global operations at the hosting and cloud subsidiary of the telco. And it looks like Terremark has caught the open source and open standards bugs.

"Verizon Terremark has long been supportive of open standards; however, now is the right time for us to get formally involved in the open-standard ecosystem," explained Drumgoole. "Our support and investment reflects our desire to see the cloud market mature quickly and provide businesses with cloud-based offerings that address specific needs like performance, cost and flexibility."

This is the first time that Terremark has invested in developing code and supporting open source projects directly, and as part of its move to embrace Xen, Terremark is kicking funds to the Linux Foundation to support that hypervisor and is joining the foundation as an advisory board member.

Citrix bought Cloud.com, which had created its own cloud control freak, back in July 2011, and opened up the code a month later. The company joined the OpenStack community, but decided after OpenStack was not making a strong enough commitment to supporting the APIs of Amazon Web Services to go its own way and donate CloudStack to the Apache community.

One way of looking at it is that Citrix has let go of both Xen and CloudStack sufficiently that a company like Verizon Terremark can feel comfortable not only supporting open source projects, but supporting these two in particular when momentum is clearly shifting towards OpenStack and KVM in a lot of ways.

An equally plausible and not incompatible interpretation of the adoption of Xen and CloudStack by Terremark is that some companies do not want or need a cloud based on VMware's ESXi hypervisor and its vCloud extensions, as the Enterprise Cloud that Terremark has spent years building, and that is running in several data centers around the globe, is.

Terremark does not provide pricing for its Enterprise Cloud, but is widely perceived to be expensive relative to Amazon Web Services and Rackspace Cloud, both of which are based on open source hypervisor and controller technologies.

AWS has its own variant of Xen and its own cloud controller, while Rackspace is using the OpenStack controller it helped create and the XenServer commercial-grade hypervisor from Citrix for its public cloud and KVM on its private cloud.

To compete with AWS and Rackspace (and other cloud providers), Terremark is going to have to pull a Rackspace and invest in open source technologies.

The wonder is why Terremark did not pick OpenStack and KVM, but the decision could have been made on the technical merits and on Verizon wanting a tighter relationship with Citrix for the many other kinds of software it makes for virtualizing desktops and managing mobile applications, for instance. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Talos names eight deadly sins in widely used industrial software
    Entire swaths of gear relies on vulnerability-laden Open Automation Software (OAS)

    A researcher at Cisco's Talos threat intelligence team found eight vulnerabilities in the Open Automation Software (OAS) platform that, if exploited, could enable a bad actor to access a device and run code on a targeted system.

    The OAS platform is widely used by a range of industrial enterprises, essentially facilitating the transfer of data within an IT environment between hardware and software and playing a central role in organizations' industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) efforts. It touches a range of devices, including PLCs and OPCs and IoT devices, as well as custom applications and APIs, databases and edge systems.

    Companies like Volvo, General Dynamics, JBT Aerotech and wind-turbine maker AES are among the users of the OAS platform.

    Continue reading
  • Despite global uncertainty, $500m hit doesn't rattle Nvidia execs
    CEO acknowledges impact of war, pandemic but says fundamentals ‘are really good’

    Nvidia is expecting a $500 million hit to its global datacenter and consumer business in the second quarter due to COVID lockdowns in China and Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Despite those and other macroeconomic concerns, executives are still optimistic about future prospects.

    "The full impact and duration of the war in Ukraine and COVID lockdowns in China is difficult to predict. However, the impact of our technology and our market opportunities remain unchanged," said Jensen Huang, Nvidia's CEO and co-founder, during the company's first-quarter earnings call.

    Those two statements might sound a little contradictory, including to some investors, particularly following the stock selloff yesterday after concerns over Russia and China prompted Nvidia to issue lower-than-expected guidance for second-quarter revenue.

    Continue reading
  • Another AI supercomputer from HPE: Champollion lands in France
    That's the second in a week following similar system in Munich also aimed at researchers

    HPE is lifting the lid on a new AI supercomputer – the second this week – aimed at building and training larger machine learning models to underpin research.

    Based at HPE's Center of Excellence in Grenoble, France, the new supercomputer is to be named Champollion after the French scholar who made advances in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs in the 19th century. It was built in partnership with Nvidia using AMD-based Apollo computer nodes fitted with Nvidia's A100 GPUs.

    Champollion brings together HPC and purpose-built AI technologies to train machine learning models at scale and unlock results faster, HPE said. HPE already provides HPC and AI resources from its Grenoble facilities for customers, and the broader research community to access, and said it plans to provide access to Champollion for scientists and engineers globally to accelerate testing of their AI models and research.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022