Intel grabs API management company Mashery

Chipzilla takes a slurp of cloud


With fewer PCs getting sold, little foothold in tablets or phones, and software is busily eating into the value of your terrifically complex server chips, getting into software must seem like a pretty smart move for a chipmaker like Intel.

Chipzilla is on a big software push, (as shown by Wednesday's switching announcement), and as part of that news broke on Wednesday that the company is acquiring Mashery, a privately held firm that develops technologies for securing, exposing, and managing APIs.

Mashery employees received an internal email on Wednesday telling them they'd been acquired, according to Read Write Web. Intel and Mashery execs subsequently confirmed to The Register that the acquisition is going ahead and is expected to within this quarter.

"The plan is that Mashery will be a key tech element of [Intel's] overall service strategy, and Mashery employees are critical to that," Mashery marketing veep Julie Gibbs said.

Mashery makes tools for managing APIs. Companies can use its tech for API key management for partners, publishing interactive API docs, and running support forums. Functionally, its technology is equivalent to that pioneered by venture-backed startup Mulesoft.

"This acquisition is the next step in building an integrated Intel suite of services (cloud services, digital store fronts, location services, network services and security)," an Intel spokeswoman told The Register. "Mashery brings technology and expertise in the management and exposure of enterprise APIs. Mashery's expertise in key verticals will enable Intel to further provide user experiences enhanced by service capabilities."

Intel used Mashery's tech for its Intel Expressway API Manager, which was announced in November. The manager paired Mashery's API management portal with Intel's security/service gateway to give enterprises what Intel termed a API management system "for enterprises looking to maximise security, performance, and developer adoption". Other Mashery customers include CBS Interactive, Argos, Best Buy, Channel 4, Comcast, and Coca Cola.

Its technology is a cloud-based multi-tenant software-as-a-service platform, and is also available in an on-premises variant dubbed "Mashery Local". The company's tech is compliant with Payment Card Industry standards, and compatible with OAuth 1.0 and Oauth 2.0 for secure API deployment.

As part of the acquisition, Mashery will become a part of the Intel Service Division, which sits inside Intel's software and services group, Gibbs said.

One area of focus for this group is delivering software "products and services that promote Intel Architecture as the platform of choice for software development".

Mashery's current employees are likely to go over to Intel, with few redundancies expected, El Reg understands. The financial terms of the deal haven't been disclosed, but we assume there's be champagne corks popping among Mashery's management team and investors. ®

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