Annular solar eclipse LIVE!

The sun is a mass of incandescent gas and the moon's in the way


PICS 'N' VID Today, folks living in remote parts of Australia's north and some Pacific islands will experience an annular eclipse, the type of eclipse just one grade below a total eclipse.

That means the sun will just remain visible as the moon passes between it and Earth.

The result will be a view of a “ring of fire” as Sol's hellish miasma of incandescent plasma pokes out ever so slightly past the moon's edge as visible down here on earth.

Here's the Space.com feed of the event.


Live broadcast by Ustream

Space.com's feed is a bit temperamental, cutting in and out, as is the Ustream source – they also intentionally cut out occasionally to readjust their camera. If that feed drives you crazy, you might try this one from the SLOOH Space Camera:

As the event passes Vulture South's Sydney, Australia, home, we'll also try to post some live photos as we're expecting 27 per cent eclipse here, which should liven up the train ride to work a little.

Pretty pictures

Plenty of pictures are emerging of the eclipse.

Here's one taken by Sydney's observatory at peak eclipse in the city.

Here's how the eclipse looked from Sydney's Manly beach:

This one's pretty, too:

Here's the view from Singapore.

Here's a look from the Big Island of Hawaii.

To finish, here's a view posted by @INFORMADORCHILE. We're not sure of the source, but it sure is a pretty one.

Lastly, if you're after more information on the Sun, the video below is as good a source as any! ®

Watch Video

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Police lab wants your happy childhood pictures to train AI to detect child abuse
    Like the Hotdog, Not Hotdog app but more Kidnapped, Not Kidnapped

    Updated Australia's federal police and Monash University are asking netizens to send in snaps of their younger selves to train a machine-learning algorithm to spot child abuse in photographs.

    Researchers are looking to collect images of people aged 17 and under in safe scenarios; they don't want any nudity, even if it's a relatively innocuous picture like a child taking a bath. The crowdsourcing campaign, dubbed My Pictures Matter, is open to those aged 18 and above, who can consent to having their photographs be used for research purposes.

    All the images will be amassed into a dataset managed by Monash academics in an attempt to train an AI model to tell the difference between a minor in a normal environment and an exploitative, unsafe situation. The software could, in theory, help law enforcement better automatically and rapidly pinpoint child sex abuse material (aka CSAM) in among thousands upon thousands of photographs under investigation, avoiding having human analysts inspect every single snap.

    Continue reading
  • Australian digital driving licenses can be defaced in minutes
    Brute force attack leaves the license wide open for undetectable alteration, but back end data remains unchanged

    An Australian digital driver's license (DDL) implementation that officials claimed is more secure than a physical license has been shown to easily defaced, but authorities insist the credential remains secure.

    New South Wales, Australia's most populous state, launched its DDL program in 2019, and as of 2021 officials there said that slightly more than half of the state's eight million people use the "Service NSW" app that displays the DDL and offers access to many other government services.

    Now, a security researcher at cybersecurity company Dvuln claims he was able to brute force his way into the app with nothing but a Python script and a consumer laptop. Once inside, he found numerous security flaws that made it simple to alter the DDL stored in the app. 

    Continue reading
  • Five Eyes alliance’s top cop says techies are the future of law enforcement
    Crims have weaponized tech and certain States let them launder the proceeds

    Australian Federal Police (AFP) commissioner Reece Kershaw has accused un-named nations of helping organized criminals to use technology to commit and launder the proceeds of crime, and called for international collaboration to developer technologies that counter the threats that behaviour creates.

    Kershaw’s remarks were made at a meeting of the Five Eyes Law Enforcement Group (FELEG), the forum in which members of the Five Eyes intelligence sharing pact – Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the UK and the USA – discuss policing and related matters. Kershaw is the current chair of FELEG.

    “Criminals have weaponized technology and have become ruthlessly efficient at finding victims,” Kerhsaw told the group, before adding : “State actors and citizens from some nations are using our countries at the expense of our sovereignty and economies.”

    Continue reading
  • Photonic processor can classify millions of images faster than you can blink
    We ask again: Has science gone too far?

    Engineers at the University of Pennsylvania say they've developed a photonic deep neural network processor capable of analyzing billions of images every second with high accuracy using the power of light.

    It might sound like science fiction or some optical engineer's fever dream, but that's exactly what researchers at the American university's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences claim to have done in an article published in the journal Nature earlier this month.

    The standalone light-driven chip – this isn't another PCIe accelerator or coprocessor – handles data by simulating brain neurons that have been trained to recognize specific patterns. This is useful for a variety of applications including object detection, facial recognition, and audio transcription to name just a few.

    Continue reading
  • World’s smallest remote-controlled robots are smaller than a flea
    So small, you can't feel it crawl

    Video Robot boffins have revealed they've created a half-millimeter wide remote-controlled walking robot that resembles a crab, and hope it will one day perform tasks in tiny crevices.

    In a paper published in the journal Science Robotics , the boffins said they had in mind applications like minimally invasive surgery or manipulation of cells or tissue in biological research.

    With a round tick-like body and 10 protruding legs, the smaller-than-a-flea robot crab can bend, twist, crawl, walk, turn and even jump. The machines can move at an average speed of half their body length per second - a huge challenge at such a small scale, said the boffins.

    Continue reading
  • China offering ten nations help to run their cyber-defenses and networks
    Sure, they’re small Pacific nations, but they’re in very strategic locations

    China has begun talking to ten nations in the South Pacific with an offer to help them improve their network infrastructure, cyber security, digital forensics and other capabilities – all with the help of Chinese tech vendors.

    Newswire Reuters broke the news of China’s ambitions after seeing a draft agreement that China’s foreign minister Wang Yi is reportedly tabling on a tour of Pacific nations this week and next.

    The draft agreement proposes assistance with data governance, training local police, and mapping the marine environment. Supply of customs management applications, possible funding of data links to island nations, and cyber-security assistance are also reportedly on the table.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022