McAfee all-in-one security suite covers PCs, tablets, and smartphones

Put your passport and ID docs in the cloud


McAfee has launched an all-in-one cross-platform security suite for consumers that incorporates online storage through biometric authentication as well as a host of other security technologies. Equally importantly, the Intel security division is trying to shake up the way security software is sold to consumers.

The McAfee LiveSafe service features a cloud-based "safety deposit box" – Personal Locker – that allows online users to store their most sensitive documents, including financial records and copies of IDs and passports, providing they fit into the 1GB allocated storage space. Users would access their documents through biometric authentication – using voice, face, and device recognition technologies.

This is delivered through Intel Identity Protection Technology, a tamper-resistant hardware authentication mechanism, built into the latest Intel processors.

The cross-device service offers protection for a user's PCs, Macs, smartphones, and tablets against the latest malware and spam, along with a host of other security technologies, including McAfee Anti-Theft. This aspect of the technology gives consumer the means to remotely lock, disable or wipe a device as well as an ability to recover some data if a device gets either lost or stolen.

The software also offers simplified password management through a facility to securely store usernames and passwords, offering users a means to log into websites with one click.

Intel is trying to make the inclusion of security technologies part of laptop and PC purchasing decisions rather than an afterthought, with big discounts for bundled versions of the technology.

The LiveSafe service will be offered from July 2013 at a special introductory price of £19.99 with the purchase of selected new PCs or tablets. LiveSafe will come preinstalled on Ultrabook devices and PCs from Dell starting on June 9. By contrast, a 12-month subscription for consumers' existing PCs and tablets will cost £79.99.

All this is a big change from offering security software to consumers as part of a 30- or 90-day trial package, offering free-of-charge basic security software packages before trying to get consumers to upgrade to paid-for products, or the frequently criticised practice of bundling trial versions of anti-virus software with third-party security patches.

Despite the new offer, McAfee has no plans to discontinue its traditional consumer and home-office security-suite and anti-virus product lines. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Intel’s Falcon Shores XPU to mix ‘n’ match CPUs, GPUs within processor package
    x86 giant now has an HPC roadmap, which includes successor to Ponte Vecchio

    After a few years of teasing Ponte Vecchio – the powerful GPU that will go into what will become one of the fastest supercomputers in the world – Intel is sharing more details of the high-performance computing chips that will follow, and one of them will combine CPUs and GPUs in one package.

    The semiconductor giant shared the details Tuesday in a roadmap update for its HPC-focused products at the International Supercomputing Conference in Hamburg, Germany.

    Intel has only recently carved out a separate group of products for HPC applications because it is now developing versions of Xeon Scalable CPUs, starting with a high-bandwidth-memory (HBM) variant of the forthcoming Sapphire Rapids chips, for high-performance kit. This chip will sport up to 64GB of HBM2e memory, which will give it quick access to very large datasets.

    Continue reading
  • Apple gets lawsuit over Meltdown and Spectre dismissed
    Judge finds security is not a central feature of iDevices

    A California District Court judge has dismissed a proposed class action complaint against Apple for allegedly selling iPhones and iPads containing Arm-based chips with known flaws.

    The lawsuit was initially filed on January 8, 2018, six days after The Register revealed the Intel CPU architecture vulnerabilities that would later come to be known as Meltdown and Spectre and would affect Arm and AMD chips, among others, to varying degrees.

    Amended in June, 2018 the complaint [PDF] charges that the Arm-based Apple processors in Cupertino's devices at the time suffered from a design defect that exposed sensitive data and that customers "paid more for their iDevices than they were worth because Apple knowingly omitted the defect."

    Continue reading
  • Microsoft fixes under-attack Windows zero-day Follina
    Plus: Intel, AMD react to Hertzbleed data-leaking holes in CPUs

    Patch Tuesday Microsoft claims to have finally fixed the Follina zero-day flaw in Windows as part of its June Patch Tuesday batch, which included security updates to address 55 vulnerabilities.

    Follina, eventually acknowledged by Redmond in a security advisory last month, is the most significant of the bunch as it has already been exploited in the wild.

    Criminals and snoops can abuse the remote code execution (RCE) bug, tracked as CVE-2022-30190, by crafting a file, such as a Word document, so that when opened it calls out to the Microsoft Windows Support Diagnostic Tool, which is then exploited to run malicious code, such spyware and ransomware. Disabling macros in, say, Word won't stop this from happening.

    Continue reading
  • AMD bests Intel in cloud CPU performance study
    Overall price-performance in Big 3 hyperscalers a dead heat, says CockroachDB

    AMD's processors have come out on top in terms of cloud CPU performance across AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform, according to a recently published study.

    The multi-core x86-64 microprocessors Milan and Rome and beat Intel Cascade Lake and Ice Lake instances in tests of performance in the three most popular cloud providers, research from database company CockroachDB found.

    Using the CoreMark version 1.0 benchmark – which can be limited to run on a single vCPU or execute workloads on multiple vCPUs – the researchers showed AMD's Milan processors outperformed those of Intel in many cases, and at worst statistically tied with Intel's latest-gen Ice Lake processors across both the OLTP and CPU benchmarks.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022