UTS Business School bakes SAP into courses

Standalone and Masters units at Oz uni get SAP's take on accounting


The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) is poised to offer courses in SAP.

The courses will be offered as either standalone subjects or as part of a Master of Business in Accounting. Bean-counting is the focus on the new courses, two of which are “foundation” level affairs consisting of a “Certificate 1 in Accounting with SAP ERP” and another subject titled “Cost and Operations Management with SAP ERP”.

Four “advanced” courses offer:

  • Certificate 2 in Accounting with SAP ERP
  • Management Accounting with SAP ERP
  • Sales and Distribution Management with SAP ERP
  • Procurement and Inventory Management with SAP ERP

SAP's saying the courses were created to create the workforce industry says it wants, but can't find. UTS' Associate Professor Bernhard Wieder sang from the same hymn sheet, saying in a canned statement “We know that a large number of organisations use enterprise systems to do their accounting and that they are looking for employees with the knowledge, practical skills and ability in SAP enterprise solutions.” He declares himself “excited to … address this shortage, which is a problem not only in Australia and New Zealand, but in many markets around the world.”

One of Australia's largest exports is higher education, so Wieder's mention of the world is not entirely press-release puffery: it's feasible graduates of these courses could fan out across the world to bring SAP accountacy lore to the planet.

The courses will use “a blended style, with face-to-face content from UTS Business School academics and online content from SAP uAcademy.” Classes start in mid-2013.

This partnership is not the first time UTS has teamed with a large IT vendor, as it has for several years worked with Cisco on an Internetworking Program that makes heavy use of Cisco certification curricula. ®

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