IiNet offloads fibre network to NBN Co

Exits Canberra FTTP market


In a bit of a game of pass-the-parcel, the fibre-to-the-home network assets that iiNet bought when it acquired TransACT Communications last year has been passed on to NBN Co for a minimum of $AU9 million.

The FTTH was a relatively small part of TransACT's network assets: it also had (through its own acquisition of Neighborhood Cable in 2007) an HFC-based network, in regional Victoria (it covered Ballarat, Geelong and Mildura); its own VDSL-based FTTP network; along with fibre and data centre assets in the ACT, all of which became part of iiNet in a $AU60 million acquisition in 2011.

The TransACT FTTP network currently passes 8,500 premises, for which NBN Co will be paying $AU9 million. Construction is planned or has begun to pass a further 4,500 premises, and completion of this would result in the further $AU5 million payment.

So far, only a limited number of premises are connected to the network. In December 2012, iiNet's total fibre-connected customers nationally – including those the company has connected as an NBN retailer – stood at 11,000.

According to telecommunications industry newsletter Communications Day, iiNet and NBN Co have no plans to negotiate further over the future of the HFC or VDSL networks. iiNet states that it intends to continue operating those networks, and will continue providing open access to the networks to other carriers. ®

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • Starlink's Portability mode lets you take your sat broadband dish anywhere*
    * Terms and so many conditions apply

    Starlink customers who've been itching to take their dish on the road can finally do so – for a price. 

    The Musk-owned satellite internet service provider quietly rolled out a feature this week called Portability which, for an additional $25 per month, will allow customers to take their service with them anywhere on the same continent – provided they can find a clear line-of-sight to the sky and the necessary power needed to keep the data flowing.

    That doesn't mean potential Starlink customers sign up for service in an area without a wait list and take their satellite to a more congested area. Sneaky, but you won't get away with it. If Starlink detects a dish isn't at its home address, there's no guarantee of service if there's not enough bandwidth to go around, or there's another outage.

    Continue reading
  • Timetable for industrial action ballot against BT imminent
    CWU deputy secretary demands better pay for staff amid cost-of-living crisis

    The Communication and Workers Union (CWU) will this week publish the timetable to run an industrial action ballot over the pay rise BT gave to members recently, with the telco's subsidiaries to vote separately.

    Earlier this month, BT paid its 58,000 frontline workers a flat rate increase of £1,500 ($1,930) for the year, upping it from the £1,200 ($1,545) initially offered. BT hadn't cleared this increase with the CWU, and the union branded the offer as unacceptable at a time when inflation in Britain is expected to soar by 10 percent this year.

    In a public town hall meeting last week, the CWU said it will take an "emergency motion" to the Annual Conference this week to "set out the exact ballot timetable," said Karen Rose, vice president at CWU.

    Continue reading
  • The right to repairable broadband befits a supposedly critical utility
    A bolt of lightning has caused me days of misery, because the fix requires too much proprietary tech

    Column I heard an electric discharge, a bit like a Jacob's ladder, immediately before a deafening crack of thunder. I'd never been so close to a lightning strike! All of the lights in the house went bright, then dimmed, then went back to normal. "Uh-oh," I thought, "I'm in trouble now." Everything in the house had been hit by a nasty surge and the oft-spoken aphorism that broadband services are now a utility to rank with water and electricity was suddenly very, very, real to me.

    But it was electricity I worried about first. I use top of the line surge protectors so my most sensitive devices – computers and monitors, of which I have many – all seemed fine. But I'd overlooked two other connections that come into nearly every home: the antenna and the phone line.

    My television seemed to have taken a direct hit. It still worked – mostly – but appeared unable to receive any digital broadcasts. That circuit, lying on the other side of the antenna lead, likely took a big hit from the lightning strike. But the rest of the television seemed fine – at first. After a few days, and several spontaneous reboots, I began to intuit that devices don't always immediately fail when hit by lightning. Sometimes they gradually shed their functions and utility.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022