HP veep scrambles for exit as PC unit burns

Replaced by EMEA grand fromage


Charl Snyman, a senior figure in HP's European PC wing, has left the company, The Channel can reveal.

Snyman landed at HP in 1999 as EMEA sales development manager, and rose through the ranks to regional veep for category management at the Printing & Personal Systems (PPS) unit.

Sources close to the company claimed HP CEO Meg Whitman is looking at ways to prevent the PC business from haemorrhaging revenues after a particularly challenging fiscal Q2.

During that quarter, ended 30 April, the division hauled in $7.58bn in revenues - a fall of one-fifth compared to the same period a year ago. Operating income was nearly slashed by half, to $239m.

The respective global bosses of the consumer and commercial PC units, Ron Coughlin and Enrique Lores, have come under pressure to devise a turnaround plan, and discussions are well underway.

One source told us Snyman's exit is "linked to the organisational [changes] - governance and process management" but the specific reasons for his departure were not disclosed.

It is not clear if Snyman has another role to walk into.

His departure comes after long serving co-MD for Europe and the head of the PC business Eric Cador called it quits in March.

A HP spokeswoman confirmed that Snyman had left the business.

"Frank Obermeier, chief operating officer for EMEA, Printing and Personal Systems Group has been announced as the new PC category lead in EMEA," said the HPer. ®

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