Italy scores in SPAAACE: ESA 'naut Parmitano pops out for walk

6 hours to juice Nauka, fix dodgy bits, grab experiments, snap AMS-02 and more


Two of the International Space Station's current batch of 'nauts are prepping for a six-and-a-half hour stroll in space to prep the orbiting craft for a new Russian module and run some repairs.

Flight Engineer Karen Nyberg assists FE Chris Cassidy and FE Luca Parmitano in spacewalk prep

Chris Cassidy (L) and Luca Parmitano (R) prep for the spacewalk with Karen Nyberg

NASA's Chris Cassidy and ESA's Luca Parmitano are scheduled to step outside at 1.10pm BST today in a jaunt that will be shown on NASA TV.

Once outside, Cassidy will head for the top of the Z1 truss to remove and replace a Space-to-Ground Transmitter Receiver Controller for video and data communication that failed in December last year.

At the same time, the 36-year-old Italian will be at the Express Logistics Carrier-2 on the starboard truss segment, grabbing two experiments from the Materials ISS Experiment-8. The Optical Reflector Materials Experiment III (ORMatE-III) and the Payload Experiment Container, which look at the effects of space on materials and processor elements, are due to hitch a ride back to Earth aboard the SpaceX-3 commercial cargo craft later this year.

The Italian astronaut will also be snapping a pic of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) particle physics detector so boffins back home can check on its condition.

The 'nauts will also work together to move two Radiator Grapple Bars, used to help remove and replace failed thermal radiators, and stick one on the port side and the other on the starboard side so that they're positioned closer to hand for crew members.

During the replacement, Parmitano will use the Candarm-2 robotic arm, operated by Flight Engineer Karen Nyberg, to motor around the station and will get rid of a failed camera assembly on the arm while he's at it.

Cassidy will also route power cables to ready the station for the new Russian Multipurpose Laboratory Module scheduled to arrive at the station later this year. Nauka, as the new module is called, will be a research facility, docking port and airlock for future Russian spacewalks and will replace the old Pirs compartment.

The NASA astronaut will also start on the installation of two Z1 truss Y-bypass jumpers, which will be completed during the 16 July spacewalk. The jumpers provide power redundancy and stability for critical station components, allowing the crew to regain loads in the event of a loss of one of the power modules without having to go outside.

Finally, the busy space walkers will install a multi-layer insulation cover on the docking interface of the Pressurized Mating Adapter-2 mounted to the Harmony module. Cassidy, on his fifth spacewalk, will be in a US suit with red stripes, while Parmitano, who's heading into the cosmos for the first time and as the first Italian astronaut to walk in space, will be in a plain suit. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Will this be one of the world's first RISC-V laptops?
    A sneak peek at a notebook that could be revealed this year

    Pic As Apple and Qualcomm push for more Arm adoption in the notebook space, we have come across a photo of what could become one of the world's first laptops to use the open-source RISC-V instruction set architecture.

    In an interview with The Register, Calista Redmond, CEO of RISC-V International, signaled we will see a RISC-V laptop revealed sometime this year as the ISA's governing body works to garner more financial and development support from large companies.

    It turns out Philipp Tomsich, chair of RISC-V International's software committee, dangled a photo of what could likely be the laptop in question earlier this month in front of RISC-V Week attendees in Paris.

    Continue reading
  • Did ID.me hoodwink Americans with IRS facial-recognition tech, senators ask
    Biz tells us: Won't someone please think of the ... fraud we've stopped

    Democrat senators want the FTC to investigate "evidence of deceptive statements" made by ID.me regarding the facial-recognition technology it controversially built for Uncle Sam.

    ID.me made headlines this year when the IRS said US taxpayers would have to enroll in the startup's facial-recognition system to access their tax records in the future. After a public backlash, the IRS reconsidered its plans, and said taxpayers could choose non-biometric methods to verify their identity with the agency online.

    Just before the IRS controversy, ID.me said it uses one-to-one face comparisons. "Our one-to-one face match is comparable to taking a selfie to unlock a smartphone. ID.me does not use one-to-many facial recognition, which is more complex and problematic. Further, privacy is core to our mission and we do not sell the personal information of our users," it said in January.

    Continue reading
  • Meet Wizard Spider, the multimillion-dollar gang behind Conti, Ryuk malware
    Russia-linked crime-as-a-service crew is rich, professional – and investing in R&D

    Analysis Wizard Spider, the Russia-linked crew behind high-profile malware Conti, Ryuk and Trickbot, has grown over the past five years into a multimillion-dollar organization that has built a corporate-like operating model, a year-long study has found.

    In a technical report this week, the folks at Prodaft, which has been tracking the cybercrime gang since 2021, outlined its own findings on Wizard Spider, supplemented by info that leaked about the Conti operation in February after the crooks publicly sided with Russia during the illegal invasion of Ukraine.

    What Prodaft found was a gang sitting on assets worth hundreds of millions of dollars funneled from multiple sophisticated malware variants. Wizard Spider, we're told, runs as a business with a complex network of subgroups and teams that target specific types of software, and has associations with other well-known miscreants, including those behind REvil and Qbot (also known as Qakbot or Pinkslipbot).

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022