New blinged-up 'iPhone 5S' touted by Jobs FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

'Champagne gold' encased mobe rumoured for September unwrap


The next-generation iPhone, one of the last devices conceived by Apple godhead Steve Jobs before his death, will hit the shelves on 10 September, according to fresh rumours.

The new spin of the iOS smartphone, expected to be called the 5S, could sport a gaudy "champagne gold" coloured case, as well as the usual white or black, Japanese Apple site Macotakara claimed.

Even though Jobs shuffled off this mortal coil almost two years ago, Apple has continued to release new iStuff devised by the billionaire baron during his gilded reign. According to the tech titan's government liaison Michael Foulkes, Jobs oversaw the design of two models of iPhone to go on sale after his death.

The new 5S is not only rumoured to be equipped with a fingerprint sensor, but it could have a protruding shape familiar to anyone blessed with an "outy" belly button.

Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst with KGI Securities, claimed this convex button could be made of sapphire, a scratch-proof material already used to cover the lens of the iPhone 5.

He said: "Convex home button creates space for fingerprint sensor; yield to improve. We think that a fingerprint sensor will be placed under the home button of iPhone 5S. However, assembling it could be difficult as the space under home button is limited as it already has to accommodate the Lightning connector, speaker and microphone. Thus, we think the shape of the home button could be changed from concave to convex to create more space for a fingerprint sensor.

"Sapphire prevents home button from being scratched. A convex home button could be more easily scratched, so a harder material is required. We believe Apple will switch from plastic to sapphire, whose hardness is second only to diamond. Sapphire would protect the home button from being scratched and the fingerprint sensor from being damaged."

A cheaper plastic model is also expected to be touted at the same time as the new flagship mobe. Designed with an eye on emerging markets, the fruity firm hopes it will convert a new generation of cost-conscious fanbois and gurlz, it is believed.

Apple has already unveiled iOS 7, which features a spooky system for tracking punters' every footstep. It also features a new "flat" design scheme that replaces the skeuomorphism of the good old days with brightly coloured icons resembling the outfits of popstar Nicki Minaj.

Of course, just like no one truly knows the mind of God, it's impossible to truly predict what plans Steve Jobs will roll out from beyond the grave. We know that usual Apple refresh schedule should see a new iPhone, iMac and Macbook Pro released later this year. But with shareholders concerned that the fruity firm has stopped innovating, the second coming of Steve Jobs might not be able to stave off a decline following Peak Apple. ®


Other stories you might like

  • We sat through Apple's product launch disguised as a dev event so you don't have to
    M2 chip teased plus MacBooks, iOS 16, macOS 13, watchOS 9 and more

    WWDC Apple opened its 33rd annual Worldwide Developer Conference on Monday with a preview of upcoming hardware and planned changes in its mobile, desktop, and wrist accessory operating systems.

    The confab consists primarily of streamed video, as it did in 2020 and 2021, though there is a limited in-person component for the favored few. Apart from the preview of Apple's homegrown Arm-compatible M2 chip – coming next month in a redesigned MacBook Air and 13" MacBook Pro – there was not much meaningful innovation. The M2 Air has a full-size touch ID button, apparently.

    Apple's software-oriented enhancements consist mainly of worthy but not particularly thrilling interface and workflow improvements, alongside a handful of useful APIs and personalization capabilities. Company video performers made no mention of Apple's anticipated AR/VR headset.

    Continue reading
  • Workers win vote to form first-ever US Apple Store union
    Results set to be ratified by labor board by end of the week

    Workers at an Apple Store in Towson, Maryland have voted to form a union, making them the first of the iGiant's retail staff to do so in the United States.

    Out of 110 eligible voters, 65 employees voted in support of unionization versus 33 who voted against it. The organizing committee, known as the Coalition of Organized Retail Employees (CORE), has now filed to certify the results with America's National Labor Relations Board. Members joining this first-ever US Apple Store union will be represented by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM).

    "I applaud the courage displayed by CORE members at the Apple store in Towson for achieving this historic victory," IAM's international president Robert Martinez Jr said in a statement on Saturday. "They made a huge sacrifice for thousands of Apple employees across the nation who had all eyes on this election."

    Continue reading
  • Apple’s M2 chip isn’t a slam dunk, but it does point to the future
    The chip’s GPU and neural engine could overshadow Apple’s concession on CPU performance

    Analysis For all the pomp and circumstance surrounding Apple's move to homegrown silicon for Macs, the tech giant has admitted that the new M2 chip isn't quite the slam dunk that its predecessor was when compared to the latest from Apple's former CPU supplier, Intel.

    During its WWDC 2022 keynote Monday, Apple focused its high-level sales pitch for the M2 on claims that the chip is much more power efficient than Intel's latest laptop CPUs. But while doing so, the iPhone maker admitted that Intel has it beat, at least for now, when it comes to CPU performance.

    Apple laid this out clearly during the presentation when Johny Srouji, Apple's senior vice president of hardware technologies, said the M2's eight-core CPU will provide 87 percent of the peak performance of Intel's 12-core Core i7-1260P while using just a quarter of the rival chip's power.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022