iWatch rumours grow as Apple hires Nike fitness guru Jay Blahnik

Latest idiot tax device might include keep-fit tech


Apple has hired a healthy living guru who helped Nike develop the FuelBand fitness bracelet to work on a mystery project for the fruity firm.

Jay Blahnik started work at Cupertino earlier this month, according to reports from unofficial Apple blog 9to5Mac. He is likely to have been hired to work on the near-mythical iWatch, which Apple are hoping will rescue the firm from accusations that its pace of innovation has slowed to a dismal crawl.

Apple boss Tim Cook has previously praised Nike's Fuelband, which tracks activity and reminds people how much exercise they have (or haven't) done that day. Addressing the D11 conference, Cook said: "You know I wear this, it’s the FuelBand. I think Nike did a great job with this. It’s for a specific area, it’s integrated well with iOS. There are lots of gadgets, wearables, in this space now. You’ve probably tried as many as I have, maybe even more... I think there’s lots of things to solve in this space, but it’s an area where it’s ripe for exploration."

Blahnik looks like the sort of positive thinker who would work well within the shiny, happy corporate world of Cupertino. With a coiffured head of blonde hair, a glowing complexion and an inability to be pictured without a huge grin on his face, he's a character right out of Apple central casting.

His Twitter account shows a breezy personality that will irk most Europeans, but probably inspire more positive-minded Americans to get out there and pound those pavements.

Here's some of his wisdom:

El Reg is not sure whether these messages makes us happy or very, very sad. ®

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