Imation's $120m baby delivers NST6000 hybrid storage mutant

NAND cache and faster controllers


Scalable storage outfit Imation's Nexsan unit has launched an uprated cached hybrid flash/disk drive array with a Gen 3 operating system: NestOS 3.0.

Nexsan, a purveyor of primary and Assureon archival data storage arrays that failed to IPO several times, was bought by Imation on January for $120m.

The NST6000 and older NST5000 are called unified storage systems, and supports SAN and NAS-style access via iSCSI, NFS, CIFS, SMB and FTP protocols. The array uses hard disk drives augmented by a FAStier cache built from SSDs, to accelerate data access.

According to Nexsan: "FASTier intelligently and automatically moves data through solid-state and spinning disk in-concert for up to 10X performance over traditional disk storage."

In effect, there is a flash-caching head with a Nexsan E-Series backend housing the SAS and SATA disk drives, or an NST224X enclosure housing SAS disk drives.

The NST6000 product has faster controllers than the NST5000 and adds Fibre Channel connectivity to the access protocol mix.

There are two kinds of NST6000 models: the NST6000 enterprise with up to 19.2TB of SSDs, and the NST6000MC metro storage cluster with high availability (through two active/active controller nodes) and DR features to sites located up to 10km away, using Fibre Channel-connected back-end E-Series disk enclosures.

The original NST5000 is a mid-market array with a choice of E-Series, NST224X or NST5100X storage enclosures behind the caching head.

The NST6530, the first NST6000 model, has up to 5PB of capacity with SATA drives or 756TB using SAS drives, and, Nexsan claims, "simultaneously supports large-scale I/O intensive workloads generated from multiple virtual machines," including both sequential and random IO. Get a spec sheet (PDF) here>

NestOS 3.0 will be made available across the Nexsan product range.

Nexsan will demo the NST6000 at VMworld 2013 in San Francisco, which takes place from 25 to 29 August. The NST6000MC is available now via Nexsan channel partners with the NST6530 and NestOS 3.0 available before winter. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • World’s smallest remote-controlled robots are smaller than a flea
    So small, you can't feel it crawl

    Video Robot boffins have revealed they've created a half-millimeter wide remote-controlled walking robot that resembles a crab, and hope it will one day perform tasks in tiny crevices.

    In a paper published in the journal Science Robotics , the boffins said they had in mind applications like minimally invasive surgery or manipulation of cells or tissue in biological research.

    With a round tick-like body and 10 protruding legs, the smaller-than-a-flea robot crab can bend, twist, crawl, walk, turn and even jump. The machines can move at an average speed of half their body length per second - a huge challenge at such a small scale, said the boffins.

    Continue reading
  • IBM-powered Mayflower robo-ship once again tries to cross Atlantic
    Whaddayaknow? It's made it more than halfway to America

    The autonomous Mayflower ship is making another attempt at a transatlantic journey from the UK to the US, after engineers hauled the vessel to port and fixed a technical glitch. 

    Built by ProMare, a non-profit organization focused on marine research, and IBM, the Mayflower set sail on April 28, beginning its over 3,000-mile voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. But after less than two weeks, the crewless ship broke down and was brought back to port in Horta in the Azores, 850 miles off the coast of Portugal, for engineers to inspect.

    With no humans onboard, the Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) can only rely on its numerous cameras, sensors, equipment controllers, and various bits of hardware running machine-learning algorithms to survive. The computer-vision software helps it navigate through choppy waters and avoid objects that may be in its path.

    Continue reading
  • Revealed: The semi-secret list of techs Beijing really really wishes it didn't have to import
    I think we can all agree that China is not alone in wishing it had an alternative to Microsoft Windows

    China has identified "chokepoints" that leave it dependent on foreign countries for key technologies, and the US-based Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET) claims to have translated and published key document that name the technologies about which Beijing is most worried.

    CSET considered 35 articles published in Science and Technology Daily from April until July 2018. Each story detailed a different “chokepoint” or tech import dependency that China faces. The pieces are complete with insights from Chinese academics, industry insiders and other experts.

    CSET said the items, which offer a rare admission of economic and technological vulnerability , have hitherto “largely unnoticed in the non-Chinese speaking world.”

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022