Brazilians tear strip off NSA in wake of Snowden, mull anti-US-spook law

South Americans demand web privacy as PRISM journalist's Brazilian boyfriend held


Businesses selling online to Brazil-based consumers could be forced to store any personal data they collect about those individuals on local servers under proposed new laws under consideration in the country.

According to an automated translation of a report by the Reuters news agency, the federal government in Brazil has proposed amendments to a new civil rights law currently being worked on called the Marco Civil da Internet. Under the amendments, data collected about Brazilian internet users would have to be stored locally.

Google and Facebook have both raised objections with the plans, according to an automated translation of a report by Agência Brasil. Both are in favour of the original proposals.

"We have concerns with the [possible] changes, such as requiring the maintenance of data in Brazil," said Bruno Magrani, head of public policy at Facebook Brazil, according to the report. "This requirement would entail huge costs and inefficiencies in online business in the country, it will impact small and new technology companies that want to provide services to Brazilians."

Microsoft already has data centres in Brazil and so sees "the location of data" issue as "irrelevant", Microsoft Brazil's director-general of legal affairs and of institutional relations, Alexandre Esper, said, according to the Agência Brasil report.

The amendments may have been prompted by revelations made about a US internet surveillance programme called PRISM, according to William Beer, an information security expert at consulting firm Alvarez & Marsal.

"There are a lot of datacenter-related issues already, such as the high cost of electricity, access to skills and even the temperature, which makes it expensive to run those facilities in Brazil," Beer said. "Then if you add regulation that will present further obstacles, companies might end up moving their IT operations to other South American countries where the rules are not so strict."

The PRISM programme, it is claimed, allows the US' National Security Agency (NSA) to collect data from a number of major technology companies, including Microsoft, Facebook and Google. The revelations came from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and were reported by a number of newspapers, including the Guardian in the UK. They have sparked concerns about the scope and oversight of such surveillance.

The Prism revelations have prompted the European Commission to conduct a review of an existing agreement that governs personal data transfers from the EU to US. In addition, a US think tank has said that US cloud providers could lose out on up to $35 billion in revenues over the next three years as a result of the adverse publicity surrounding the Prism programme.

Copyright © 2013, Out-Law.com

Out-Law.com is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.


Keep Reading

Tech Resources

What WAF is right for you

Applications are architected in many ways, but all need protection from threats. Learn the most important things to consider when choosing a WAF.

Three reasons you need a hybrid multicloud

Businesses need their IT teams to operate applications and data in a hybrid environment spanning on-premises private and public clouds. But this poses many challenges, such as managing complex networking, re-architecting applications for the cloud, and managing multiple infrastructure silos. There is a pressing need for a single platform that addresses these challenges - a hybrid multicloud built for the digital innovation era. Just this Regcast to find out: Why hybrid multicloud is the ideal path to accelerate cloud migration.

Top 20 Private Cloud Questions Answered

Download this asset for straight answers to your top private cloud questions.

How backup modernization changes the ransomware game

If the thrill of backing up your data and wondering if you will ever see it again has worn off, start the new year by getting rid of the lingering pain of legacy backup. Bipul Sinha, CEO of the Cloud Data Management Company, Rubrik, and Miguel Zatarain, Director of Global Infrastructure Technology at PACCAR, Fortune 500 manufacturer of trucks and Rubrik customer, are talking to the Reg’s Tim Phillips about how to eliminate the costly, slow and spotty performance of legacy backup, and how to modernize your implementation in 2021 to make your business more resilient.

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021