Apple blings up new iMac with latest Intel chips, next-gen Wi-Fi

Stylish onesie of the desktop world gets an update


Apple has unleashed an update of its all-in-one iMac line, which will now come with boosted Wi-Fi and a beefed-up Haswell processor.

The iMac is the technological equivalent of the onesie – all-in-one babygros beloved of Bieber and other nubile young boybadours.

It contains all the Apple goodness in one package, meaning fanbois can disappear into the iMatrix without having to plug a big ugly monitor into a bigger, uglier box.

The latest iMac comes with speedy 802.11ac Wi-Fi and new Intel Haswell processors, which are designed with power conservation in mind and have doubled the battery life of the latest model of the Macbook Air. They are unlikely to have the same effect on the new iMac because – wait for it – there's no battery.

The newbie iMac prices range from £1,149 for the 21.5-incher with a quad-core, 2.7GHz i5 processor with Intel Iris Pro integrated graphics offering "unprecedented levels of integrated graphics performance". Although this computer is badboy enough for most tasks, for an extra £150, Apple's 21.5-incher will swap out the integrated graphics for advanced Nvidia GeForce 700 graphics and a 2.9GHz i5.

The 27-inch model should make anyone used to a teeny-tiny 11-inch Macbook Air feel totally inadequate. The model – which will set you back a not-inconsiderable £1,599 – comes with a 3.2GHz quad-core Intel Core i5, NVIDIA GeForce GT 755M and 1GB video memory. For a hefty £1,749, Apple will give you a 27-incher with a 3.4GHz i5, GeForce GTX 775M and 2GB of video memory.

All of the iMacs come with 8GB of memory, and there's an option to pick a 1TB fusion drive that combines a hard disk with a flash cache for the best of both storage worlds.

"iMac continues to be the example that proves how beautiful, fast and fun a desktop computer can be," said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. "Inside its ultra-thin aluminum enclosure, the new iMac has the latest Intel processors, faster graphics, next generation 802.11ac Wi-Fi and faster PCIe flash storage."

Is it £1k+ worth of desktop? Depends who you're asking... As ever, we await your comments. ®

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