Ditch your boring iPhone for a hot Android piece, says Google's TOTALLY UNBIASED Eric Schmidt

Exec chairman delivers a backhander for many mobe-makers


Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt has shown that as a marketer, diplomat and technical writer, he makes a pretty good figurehead/roving-technology-talker-upper – by penning Eric’s Guide: Converting to Android from iPhone.

That'll be the Android mobile operating system from Google.

There's precious little in the guide you would not expect from Schmidt, who kicks off by saying that many of his friends are migrating, and that “the latest high-end phones from Samsung (Galaxy S4), Motorola (Verizon Droid Ultra) and the LG Nexus 5 (for AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile) have better screens, are faster, and have a much more intuitive interface. They are a great Christmas present to an iPhone user!”

Just what all other Android handset-makers are to make of that is anyone's guess, but the omission of HTC won't be welcome at that struggling outfit, while the likes of Lenovo and Sony are presumably wondering why they bother getting out of bed in the morning after learning that the influential Schmidt doesn't rate their best efforts on par with Apple's.

There's a little America-centrism at work here, too. China's Xiaomi is widely held to make a cracking 'Droid, and Vulture South has briefly beheld marvellous Asia-only kit from Lenovo.

Having shown off his diplomatic and marketing skills in the introduction, Schmidt goes on to show he's not conversant with the gentle art of technical writing with procedures that use inconsistent verbs, fail to open each step of a procedure with an active verb and make assumptions that lead to user-befuddling ambiguities.

His overall intention, however, is crystal clear as the guide makes no attempt at balance: Schmidt assumes you're going Google from end-to-end and offers instructions accordingly. He even suggests iPhone owners could consider doing without a final backup for their photos and instead “... send them to Gmail and download into the Android phone.” ®


Other stories you might like

  • Running Windows 10? Microsoft is preparing to fire up the update engines

    Winter Windows Is Coming

    It's coming. Microsoft is preparing to start shoveling the latest version of Windows 10 down the throats of refuseniks still clinging to older incarnations.

    The Windows Update team gave the heads-up through its Twitter orifice last week. Windows 10 2004 was already on its last gasp, have had support terminated in December. 20H2, on the other hand, should be good to go until May this year.

    Continue reading
  • Throw away your Ethernet cables* because MediaTek says Wi-Fi 7 will replace them

    *Don't do this

    MediaTek claims to have given the world's first live demo of Wi-Fi 7, and said that the upcoming wireless technology will be able to challenge wired Ethernet for high-bandwidth applications, once available.

    The fabless Taiwanese chip firm said it is currently showcasing two Wi-Fi 7 demos to key customers and industry collaborators, in order to demonstrate the technology's super-fast speeds and low latency transmission.

    Based on the IEEE 802.11be standard, the draft version of which was published last year, Wi-Fi 7 is expected to provide speeds several times faster than Wi-Fi 6 kit, offering connections of at least 30Gbps and possibly up to 40Gbps.

    Continue reading
  • Windows box won't boot? SystemRescue 9 may help

    An ISO image you can burn or drop onto a USB key

    The latest version of an old friend of the jobbing support bod has delivered a new kernel to help with fixing Microsoft's finest.

    It used to be called the System Rescue CD, but who uses CDs any more? Enter SystemRescue, an ISO image that you can burn, or just drop onto your Ventoy USB key, and which may help you to fix a borked Windows box. Or a borked Linux box, come to that.

    SystemRescue 9 includes Linux kernel 5.15 and a minimal Xfce 4.16 desktop (which isn't loaded by default). There is a modest selection of GUI tools: Firefox, VNC and RDP clients and servers, and various connectivity tools – SSH, FTP, IRC. There's also some security-related stuff such as Yubikey setup, KeePass, token management, and so on. The main course is a bunch of the usual Linux tools for partitioning, formatting, copying, and imaging disks. You can check SMART status, mount LVM volumes, rsync files, and other handy stuff.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022