Want more software built for HANA? Cry us a River, SAP. Oh wait, you have

New dev language for polishing backends, plus HTML5 tools open-sourced


SAP is embracing open-source developers to promote its flagship HANA in-memory data and application architecture.

The software giant announced today SAP River, a hosted development environment for building native backend applications using HANA.

SAP River will be available worldwide on the company's HANA Cloud Platform, aka HANA One on Amazon Web Services, and for on-premises installations for use on HANA SP7.

Also, SAP is releasing “key portions” of its new HTML5 development environment called SAPUI5 under an Apache open-source license on Github.

SAP is bolstering the code drop with themes, frameworks, and control libraries to help kickstart development.

The company’s also released a Service Broker for the VMware-backed Cloud Foundry on GitHub under an open license. Service Broker will be released for other cloud architectures if SAP decides it’s worthwhile. SAP reckoned Service Broker will let any Cloud Foundry application “connect to and leverage the in memory capabilities” of HANA.

The broker was developed with Pivotal, spun out of VMware.

Vishal Sikka, SAP executive board member and co-creator of HANA, said in a statement River will “dramatically simplify” application development. SAP’s hug of open source would make it easier for devs to get started with SAP technologies, too, he said.

The love for Github follows last month’s release of a Node.js connector for Hana to the code-hosting site. A closed beta of SAP PowerBuilder 15 for 32- and 64-bit SQL Server 2012, Oracle 12, Windows 8, Microsoft’s .NET 4.5 and for OData is due on Friday. ®

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