Parisian cabbies smash up Uber-booked rival ride

Votre app américain sale n'a pas été cherché ici, imbécile!


French taxi drivers have taken to the streets to show their displeasure with Uber, a smartphone app that helps people find drivers-for-hire and car sharers.

Uber-booked motors yesterday came under attack from cabbies, who are furious that they must compete against the internet service.

Kat Borlongan, co-founder of open data management firm Five By Five, said that while riding in an Uber vehicle on a freeway in Paris, she witnessed protesters blocking traffic and targeting the car service's vehicles. Borlongan's ride suffered significant damage in the attack, she said, but was able to escape.

Borlongan reported no serious injuries and said that the driver was able to get to safety and fix a flat tire caused by the attack. The company has confirmed the report that its vehicle had been targeted.

"That taxis chose to use violence today is unacceptable, that they chose to strike is their business," the company said in a blog post. "However, Parisians also have a choice when it comes to moving around in their city, and today’s incident certainly discourages Parisians from choosing a taxi for their next ride."

Uber has been under fire in France because it has been seen as competition for the nation's registered taxi services. Earlier this year, the country enacted a law that enforces a mandatory 15-minute waiting period between reservation-placement and pickup for any private service as a way to distinguish the companies from taxis, which can instantly pick up passengers.

Private car companies such as Uber and Lyft have seen their popularity soar in recent years as social networking and smartphone platforms have allowed users to quickly schedule rides and share information about the services.

The companies have seen significant blowback from the commercial taxi industry in many markets, however, with cabbies arguing that they are circumventing the heavily regulated systems for licensing and managing taxis in most major cities. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Ex-Uber security chief accused of hushing database breach must face fraud charges
    Company execs and their lawyers are paying close attention to this one

    A US judge yesterday threw out an attempt to dismiss wire fraud charges against a former Uber employee accused of trying to cover up a computer crime.

    Former Uber security chief Joseph Sullivan is set to face criminal charges after US District Judge William Orrick yesterday [PDF] rejected his claim that prosecutors did not "adequately" allege that the goal of the claimed misrepresentation of the security breach was to get Uber's drivers to stay with the platform and continue paying service fees.

    In December last year, a federal grand jury handed down a superseding indictment adding wire fraud to the list of charges pending against Sullivan for his role in the alleged attempted cover-up of the 2016 security breach at Uber. The incident led to around 57 million user and driver records being stolen.

    Continue reading
  • Enemies Waymo, Uber now friends making self-driving-ish trucks for US highways
    When you think about it, it makes cents

    Waymo and Uber announced on Tuesday a "long-term strategic partnership" promising to work together to deploy autonomous freight trucks on US roads, years after both companies fought bitterly over self-driving technology. 

    The collaboration will see Waymo retrofitting trucks with its AI-powered driving software operating on Uber's logistics and network infrastructure. Shippers can tap into the Uber Freight service to connect with truckers willing to deliver their goods across the country. Vehicles running the Waymo Driver software will be able to complete part of the journey autonomously, although human drivers will still need to be present.

    "With trucking, we plan to first tackle highway driving," a spokesperson from Waymo told The Register. "It's a natural environment to start this deployment due to the large number of highway miles, which are often the most tiring stretches for humans to drive, and which are a large opportunity to improve efficiency in the industry."

    Continue reading
  • France levels up local video game slang with list of French terms to replace foreign words
    Goodbye cloudy retro-gaming, bonjour ‘rétrojeu video en nuage’

    France’s Commission d'enrichissement de la langue française* has decided to offer citizens new ways to describe video games in the language of the land.

    The Commission’s mission is to create new terms that replace adopted words from foreign languages that become part of common speech in France, so that French doesn’t have gaps in vocabulary.

    On Sunday, the French ministry of culture therefore issued new guidance [PDF] about how to discuss video games in French.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022