Googorola's Dennis Woodside shuffles over to Dropbox

Ex-Google and Motorola bod leaves for cloud biz ahead of Lenovo sale


Googorola employee Dennis Woodside has reportedly been lured away from his role as chief exec of Motorola Mobility, ahead of its sale to Lenovo, to the newly created chief operating officer position at cloud sync and backup firm Dropbox.

Woodside has been with Google for more than ten years and most recently headed up the Moto handset business for the Chocolate Factory, but will be leaving to oversee Dropbox's online storage business in the new COO role, people familiar with the matter told Reuters and the Wall Street Journal.

The appointment was later confirmed by Google chief exec Larry Page, who said that top Googlers Nikesh Arora and Jonathan Rosenberg would be taking over Woodside's duties.

"Dennis and the team have reinvented Motorola, with wonderful products like Moto X and Moto G," Page said. "I wish him all the best with his new big job at Dropbox."

Rosenberg, who used to be head of product management for Google, will become chief operating officer of Moto backed up by Arora, who is Google's chief business officer and the executive chairman of Moto's operating board.

The reshuffle comes just ahead of the sale of Moto's handset biz to Chinese firm Lenovo, which is planning to pay $2.9bn for the firm, pending regulatory approval of the acquisition.

Over at Dropbox, the firm is trying to expand its business customer base while also pondering a potential IPO. The company's latest funding round secured $350m from investors including BlackRock and T. Rowe Price, valuing the firm at $10bn. ®

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • I was fired for blowing the whistle on cult's status in Google unit, says contractor
    The internet giant, a doomsday religious sect, and a lawsuit in Silicon Valley

    A former Google video producer has sued the internet giant alleging he was unfairly fired for blowing the whistle on a religious sect that had all but taken over his business unit. 

    The lawsuit demands a jury trial and financial restitution for "religious discrimination, wrongful termination, retaliation and related causes of action." It alleges Peter Lubbers, director of the Google Developer Studio (GDS) film group in which 34-year-old plaintiff Kevin Lloyd worked, is not only a member of The Fellowship of Friends, the exec was influential in growing the studio into a team that, in essence, funneled money back to the fellowship.

    In his complaint [PDF], filed in a California Superior Court in Silicon Valley, Lloyd lays down a case that he was fired for expressing concerns over the fellowship's influence at Google, specifically in the GDS. When these concerns were reported to a manager, Lloyd was told to drop the issue or risk losing his job, it is claimed. 

    Continue reading
  • Will Lenovo ever think beyond hardware?
    Then again, why develop your own software à la HPE GreenLake when you can use someone else's?

    Analysis Lenovo fancies its TruScale anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform as a more flexible competitor to HPE GreenLake or Dell Apex. Unlike its rivals, Lenovo doesn't believe it needs to mimic all aspects of the cloud to be successful.

    While subscription services are nothing new for Lenovo, the company only recently consolidated its offerings into a unified XaaS service called TruScale.

    On the surface TruScale ticks most of the XaaS boxes — cloud-like consumption model, subscription pricing — and it works just like you'd expect. Sign up for a certain amount of compute capacity and a short time later a rack full of pre-plumbed compute, storage, and network boxes are delivered to your place of choosing, whether that's a private datacenter, colo, or edge location.

    Continue reading
  • End of the road for biz living off free G Suite legacy edition
    Firms accustomed to freebies miffed that web giant's largess doesn't last

    After offering free G Suite apps for more than a decade, Google next week plans to discontinue its legacy service – which hasn't been offered to new customers since 2012 – and force business users to transition to a paid subscription for the service's successor, Google Workspace.

    "For businesses, the G Suite legacy free edition will no longer be available after June 27, 2022," Google explains in its support document. "Your account will be automatically transitioned to a paid Google Workspace subscription where we continue to deliver new capabilities to help businesses transform the way they work."

    Small business owners who have relied on the G Suite legacy free edition aren't thrilled that they will have to pay for Workspace or migrate to a rival like Microsoft, which happens to be actively encouraging defectors. As noted by The New York Times on Monday, the approaching deadline has elicited complaints from small firms that bet on Google's cloud productivity apps in the 2006-2012 period and have enjoyed the lack of billing since then.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022