Blinking good: LG launches smart light bulb for Android/iOS

Smart Lamp could make your office party go with a swing


LG has launched the Smart Lamp, a hi-tech light bulb which can be controlled by smartphone that looks to have the potential to both secure an office and liven up the Christmas party held within its walls.

The Smart Lamp is a 60W LED light bulb which can communicate with iOS 6.0 and above or Android 4.3 and above smartphones by Bluetooth or WiFi, according to the Korean electronics-maker.

Slotting into a regular domestic light bulb socket, the smart device can apparently last up to 10 years when used for about five hours a day, which LG reckons is an 80 per cent energy saving on traditional incandescent bulbs.

However, the real benefits come when users download the accompanying app to control lighting in their home or office.

A “security mode”, for example, allows users to remotely turn lights on or off in various parts of the building at pre-determined times, in order to discourage burglars.

The lights can also be set to blink on and off if the user receives a phone call – a handy feature if a smartphone has been left accidentally on silent or in another room, but less practical for an office environment.

The Smart Lamp can also be set to come and gradually grow brighter – perhaps a useful function for those who prefer a gentler way to wake up than a noisy alarm.

Finally, LG claimed that a “play mode” would adjust the bulb’s brightness according to songs played on an accompanying smartphone – perfect for lazy ravers who can’t be bothered to leave the house, or that office Christmas party on a budget.

The Smart Lamp is only available in Korea at the moment at a cost of 35,000 won (£20) per bulb.

LG will be going bulb-to-bulb with Philips in this burgeoning smart electronics segment.

The Dutch giant last year launched its Hue lighting system, although that requires users to install a separate device which acts as a bridge between app and bulb. ®

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