Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED

Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle


Apple again dominated all Silicon Valley competition in 2013, so much so that in the San Jose Mercury News' SV150 annual ranking, it raked in more revenue than numbers two and three combined, and more profits than the four below it, taken together.

List of the top 15 companies in the San Jose Mercury News SV150

The top 15 companies in the SV150 (click to enlarge)

Apple's revenues (sales) of $174bn in its four most recent quarters were more than the $172bn of Google and HP combined, and its $37bn in profits were more than the $36bn combined take of Google, HP, Intel, and Cisco.

"For all the attention and scrutiny it gets and for all the speculation and debate it sparks about whether it's done innovating, Apple remains fundamentally a very successful formula," IDC analyst John Jackson told the Merc.

These numbers may not be surprising, considering that as of Monday morning Apple still held the title of the world's most valuable public company in terms of market capitalization at $463.78bn, according to MarketWatch, still ahead of ExxonMobil at $417.95bn, and with Google coming on strong at $359.54bn.

In the SV150, in which the Merc ranks public technology companies headquartered in Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara counties – a wide swath of the lower San Francisco Bay Area – Google is also coming on strong: in 2012 they ranked number four behind Intel; this year they leapfrogged Chipzilla into the number three spot.

In addition to the straightforward ranking, there are some other numbers of interest tucked away inside the SV150's searchable database. For example, Apple outspent HP in research and development, $4.7bn to $3.2bn. Intel was number one in R&D with a $10.6bn spend, with Google number two at just under $8bn.

Apple also returned more money to its investors than any other Silicon Valley company: directly with $10.8bn in dividends and indirectly in just under $26bn in stock repurchasing. Number-two in dividends Intel was far behind at $4.5bn, and the number-two repurchaser Oracle spent less than half as much as Apple in this stock value–increasing stratagem at $10.6bn.

Apple's tax bill was also a surprise – at least to this observer – considering its hefty offshore cash holdings. According to the Merc, Apple paid $13.2bn in taxes, far more than Intel's $3bn, Google's $2.3bn, Cisco's $1.9bn, and HP's $1.5bn. In fact, Apple paid more in taxes than those companies combined, plus eBay and Oracle.

Speaking of Oracle, here's one last statistical tidbit: its profits of $11.1bn ranked it reasonably close behind the number-two earner, Google, which posted $12.9bn in income.

The quarterly earnings reporting season is now getting underway, with Intel set to announce its numbers tomorrow and Apple next Wednesday. (Oracle and HP are on a different cadence: Larry's folks announced their results last month, and Meg's bean counters reveal theirs next month.)

Tune in to The Reg after the New York markets close on earnings days to get the latest scores in this ongoing high-roller sweepstakes. ®


Other stories you might like

  • SpaceX Starlink sat streaks now present in nearly a fifth of all astronomical images snapped by Caltech telescope

    Annoying, maybe – but totally ruining science, no

    SpaceX’s Starlink satellites appear in about a fifth of all images snapped by the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), a camera attached to the Samuel Oschin Telescope in California, which is used by astronomers to study supernovae, gamma ray bursts, asteroids, and suchlike.

    A study led by Przemek Mróz, a former postdoctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and now a researcher at the University of Warsaw in Poland, analysed the current and future effects of Starlink satellites on the ZTF. The telescope and camera are housed at the Palomar Observatory, which is operated by Caltech.

    The team of astronomers found 5,301 streaks leftover from the moving satellites in images taken by the instrument between November 2019 and September 2021, according to their paper on the subject, published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters this week.

    Continue reading
  • AI tool finds hundreds of genes related to human motor neuron disease

    Breakthrough could lead to development of drugs to target illness

    A machine-learning algorithm has helped scientists find 690 human genes associated with a higher risk of developing motor neuron disease, according to research published in Cell this week.

    Neuronal cells in the central nervous system and brain break down and die in people with motor neuron disease, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the baseball player who developed it. They lose control over their bodies, and as the disease progresses patients become completely paralyzed. There is currently no verified cure for ALS.

    Motor neuron disease typically affects people in old age and its causes are unknown. Johnathan Cooper-Knock, a clinical lecturer at the University of Sheffield in England and leader of Project MinE, an ambitious effort to perform whole genome sequencing of ALS, believes that understanding how genes affect cellular function could help scientists develop new drugs to treat the disease.

    Continue reading
  • Need to prioritize security bug patches? Don't forget to scan Twitter as well as use CVSS scores

    Exploit, vulnerability discussion online can offer useful signals

    Organizations looking to minimize exposure to exploitable software should scan Twitter for mentions of security bugs as well as use the Common Vulnerability Scoring System or CVSS, Kenna Security argues.

    Better still is prioritizing the repair of vulnerabilities for which exploit code is available, if that information is known.

    CVSS is a framework for rating the severity of software vulnerabilities (identified using CVE, or Common Vulnerability Enumeration, numbers), on a scale from 1 (least severe) to 10 (most severe). It's overseen by First.org, a US-based, non-profit computer security organization.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022