'Spy-proof' IM launched: Aims to offer anonymity to whistleblowers

*reaction gif* I'm just getting all the secret files. BRB...


Security experts have teamed up to created a stealthy internet messenger client designed especially for whistleblowers.

The ‪invisible.im project promises an instant messenger that leaves no trace‬. The team behind the project include Metasploit Founder HD Moore and noted infosec and opsec experts The Grugq.

That's the infosec equivalent of putting together Worf and Spock to fend off starfleet enemies, so the results are sure to be worth watching.

‪invisible.im ‬is primarily geared towards serving the stringent anonymity needs of whistleblowers, as the project website explains.

invisible.im was established to develop an instant messenger and file transfer tool that leaves virtually no evidence of conversations or transfers having occurred. The primary use case for this technology is for whistleblowers and media sources who wish to remain anonymous when communicating with the press or other organisations.

The project, which is still in its early stages, is looking for developers to port its concept to various platforms (Windows, OS X and Linux). It also wants software and security experts capable of hooking the software into the darknet, specifically the i2p anonymisation network. It is also very keen to work with developers who are knowledgable about Tor.

SecureDrop and StrongBox are a good approach for large media organisation such as the New York Times but "are complex and require secure supporting infrastructure". ‪invisible.im‬ aims to plug this gap with technology an "instant message and file transfer client that leaves as small a metadata trail as possible". TorChat offers anonymity but still requires a registered IM account with an IM provider like AOL, Yahoo or MS that inevitably leaks metadata.

‪invisible.im ‬openly acknowledges that any system it develops is never going to offer absolute anonymity under all circumstances.

"If a source is already the subject of targeted surveillance, Invisible.im cannot facilitate secure, anonymous chats," it concedes.

More details on the scope of the project and its general design principles can be found in the FAQ section on the ‪invisible.im ‬website here. ®

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