Apple BANS 2 chemicals from iPhone, iPad final assembly line

Cupertino tells suppliers to stop using benzene and n-hexane


Apple has reportedly banned its suppliers from using two potentially hazardous chemicals in the final production of the company's iThings.

It made the decision to ban benzene and n-hexane from factories where suppliers were building Cupertino's fondleslabs, smartphones, MP3 players and Mac computers after it was claimed that exposing roughly 500,000 workers to the chemicals could pose a health risk.

Apple has denied the allegation from activists, but nonetheless decided to withdraw the substances from final assembly lines at the production plants in China, Brazil, Ireland and Texas and California in the US, according to the Associated Press.

The Tim Cook-run corporation said it investigated 22 factories during a four-month period, but found no evidence to support the claim that the chemicals threatened the well-being of staff.

Apple apparently did find traces of benzene and n-hexane at four factories but said the levels fell within acceptable safety levels, the AP report added.

However, the chemicals are still being used at earlier points in the production of Apple's gizmos.

Benzene is a carcinogenic substance that can cause acute myeloid leukemia and hematotoxicity, while n-hexane is understood to have links to nerve damage. ®


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