Twitter gives ANALYTICS to the unwashed masses

Obsessing over hit counts no longer just for advertisers and celebrities


Twitter has announced that it is making its full analytics platform available to everyone.

The company had made the service available in July to advertisers and verified accounts in a limited rollout. Now everyone can check out their stats.

The news was broken by Twitter engineer Ian Chan via, characteristically, a Tweet:

The dashboard allows users to view impressions on tweets over the course of 28 day spans and compare impressions on individual tweets with those in the past. Users can also view and rank tweets based on number of engagements and engagement rate (the number of impressions that result in a retweet, reply, follow or favorite).

Other options include the ability to analyze follower activity and keep track of how a user's promoted tweets are faring. The dashboard also tracks replies and click rates for links in tweets. All of the dashboard data can be exported for spreadsheet use.

In addition to growing (or deflating) the egos of Twitter addicts, the Analytics Dashboard could also provide a valuable tool to bloggers, business owners and others who use their Twitter accounts to support their sites and businesses. By keeping track of the impressions and engagements, users will be able to get an idea of what works and what doesn't with their feeds and followers. ®

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