Oracle plans German DCs to soothe NSA-ruffled nerves

Bit barns for Frankfurt, Munich


Oracle has become the latest US IT giant to placate European businesses with extra local data centres.

According to V3.co.uk, the company's Loïc le Guisquet, EMEA executive veep, told Oracle's OpenWorld conference on Sunday that there will be two new bit barns opened in Germany in the coming weeks.

The Frankfurt and Munich facilities will, le Guisquet said, provide cloud services “to those businesses in the German market whose preference is for cloud applications deployed in Germany”.

While he's not quoted directly referring to the NSA or Edward Snowden's leaks, le Guisquet did state that as well as strong demand in Germany, “questions around security” prompted the cloud giant's decision to add Germany to its existing Euro data centres in the UK and the Netherlands.

Jurisdiction over data apparently remained a concern among those in the OpenWorld audience, with le Guisquet noting that “in terms of privacy laws the data centres we have in the EU cater for any customers in the EU”. The country-by-country rollout at least provides “specificity” in regulatory terms, he suggested.

Last week, Google announced it's building a new €600 million data centre in The Netherlands. The Chocolate Factory, however, didn't cite security concerns, but rather focussed on cheap energy and access to submarine cables as driving its decision. ®


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