Mozilla makes first-ever acquisition: Web-clipping app 'Pocket'

App scrapes content into devices for later viewing, even offline, advances Moz mission to make web accessible


Mozilla has acquired Read It Later, Inc. the developer of a web clipping app called “Pocket”.

Pocket lets you bookmark content from the web and then syncs it to make it accessible on all manner of devices, even when they are offline. The service can pull off this trick for text,images and video. Read It Later, Inc. claims 22 million users for the service. Mozilla says 10 million of those users are active.

Mozilla says Pocket “contributes to our strategy by growing our mobile presence and providing people everywhere with powerful tools to discover and access high quality web content, on their terms, independent of platform or content silo.”

Pocket will become part of Mozilla's open source efforts, but will operate as a subsidiary of Mozilla Corporation.

Mozilla was already integrating Pocket into Firefox and says that effort led the two organisations to believe they could take the app further by combining forces.

What's in store hasn't been explained but we do know that Pocket currently has a Firefox extension. At a guess that could become a more integral part of Firefox and the Mozilla brand could find its way into Pocket's apps to give the organisation a beyond-the-browser presence on Android and iOS.

There's also the small matter of money to consider, as Pocket offers a paid premium service and adds sponsored posts to the feed of recommended content it offers users. Mozilla's tried ads too, but binned its efforts citing the need to focus on core user concerns. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Japan picks AWS and Google for first gov cloud push

    Local players passed over for Digital Agency’s first project

    Japan's Digital Agency has picked Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud for its first big reform push.

    The Agency started operations in September 2021, years after efforts like the UK's Government Digital Service (GDS) or Australia's Digital Transformation Agency (DTA). The body was a signature reform initiated by Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, who spent his year-long stint in the top job trying to curb Japan's reliance on paper documents, manual processes, and faxes. Japan's many government agencies also operated their websites independently of each other, most with their own design and interface.

    The new Agency therefore has a remit to "cut across all ministries" and "provide services that are driven not toward ministries, agency, laws, or systems, but toward users and to improve user-experience".

    Continue reading
  • Singaporean minister touts internet 'kill switch' that finds kids reading net nasties and cuts 'em off ASAP

    Fancies a real-time crowdsourced content rating scheme too

    A Minister in the Singapore government has suggested the creation of an internet kill switch that would prevent minors from reading questionable material online – perhaps using ratings of content created in real time by crowdsourced contributors.

    "The post-COVID world will bring new challenges globally, including to us in the security arena," said Minister for Defence Dr Ng Eng Hen at a Tuesday ceremony to award the city-state's 2021 Defense Technology Prize.

    "For operations, the SAF (Singapore Armed Force) has to expand its capabilities in the digital domain. Whether for administrative or operational purposes, I think that we will need to leverage technology to the maximum," he declared.

    Continue reading
  • China Telecom booted out of USA as Feds worry it could disrupt or spy on local networks

    FCC urges more action against Huawei and DJI, too

    The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has terminated China Telecom's authority to provide communications services in the USA.

    In its announcement of the termination, the government agency explained the decision is necessary because the national security environment has changed in the years since 2002. That was when China Telecom was first allowed to operate in the USA.

    The FCC now believes – partly based on classified advice from national security agencies – that China Telecom can "access, store, disrupt, and/or misroute US communications, which in turn allow them to engage in espionage and other harmful activities against the United States." And because China Telecom is state-controlled, China's government can compel the carrier to act as it sees fit, without judicial review or oversight.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021