TalkTalk customers demand opt-out fix for telco's DNS ad-jacking tactics

Error Replacement Service is a neat moneyspinner for ISP


Budget ISP TalkTalk has been accused of forcing customers to remain opted into a so-called Error Replacement Service that swaps NXDomain DNS results with an IP address.

The option to turn off the system has been busted for months now, but subscribers are still waiting for TalkTalk to fix the error with the Error Replacement Service.

Reg reader John flagged up TalkTalk's sluggish response to complaints about the system, which the Dido Harding-run firm uses to bag cash from typographical errors that are tapped into browser address bars.

"The cynic would say TalkTalk's apparent slowness in fixing the issue could be because the 'service' generates money for TalkTalk and they don't want people to opt out," he argued.

TalkTalk has been receiving gripes about the system for at least four months as this forum thread shows, and – having admitted that the opt-out option was broken – the ISP has yet to provide a fix to its customers.

TalkTalk's Error Replacement Service error

Last month, TalkTalk said:

The TalkTalk error replacement service helps customers find the right website when a web address isn't recognised.

The ability to opt out of the service isn't working as it should. Our engineers are working hard to fix the opt-out function and hope to have the issue resolved by the end of January.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused during this time and we'll keep you updated as we get more information.

El Reg asked TalkTalk to comment on this story, but it hadn't got back to us at the time of publication. ®

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