Check Point buys bare-metal security upstart Hyperwise

Sandbox-friendly securo-baby snapped up


Check Point has pounced early to buy up stealth-mode security startup Hyperwise, which does sandboxing on the CPU itself rather than in the OS.

Financial terms of the deal, announced on Wednesday, were not disclosed.

Israel-based Hyperwise’s CPU level threat prevention technology is designed to throttle malware-based attacks at birth. Check Point aims to harness Hyperwise’s tech to detect threats at the pre-infection stage.

Incorporating Hyperwise’s technology will help Check Point block previously undetected attacks, thereby increasing Check Point’s Threat Emulation malware catch rates.

In a statement, Check Point said that the transaction won’t have a material effect on its financial results. ®

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