Seven months of Basil Brush on YouTube: Er, boom boom?

Foxy old TV character just can't get the airtime

20 Reg comments Got Tips?

Legendary stuffed TY character Basil Brush will now be available on YouTube, after TV bosses reportedly refused to give him fresh airtime.

According to the Daily Mirror, Brush will be releasing a new sketch every Monday for the next 32 weeks.

Brush, who, we are told, is currently on a nationwide tour, said: “I was on the Beeb from the 60s to the 80s then we did The Basil Brush Show, Blue Peter and Basil’s Swap Shop.

“Times change but it doesn’t mean people can’t still enjoy my 'Boom! Boom!' I feel there is room for mainstream AND my digital platform. I’m very excited.”

Rather forlornly, the 50-year-old TV entertainer added: "I want to reach as many fans as possible and you never know when the time is right and Auntie Beeb comes knocking I will still be there for her!"

The original Basil Brush aired on BBC TV from the 1960s until the 1980s. A brief reboot in the mid-2000s met with moderate success.

Unhelpfully, the Mirror didn't include a link to Brush's new YouTube channel, meaning even if we wanted to subject our readers to seven months of "HAHAHA BOOM BOOM" gags, we can't. Small mercies, and all that. ®

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